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lab06 - 6-1 SPRING 2010 BTNY 210 NAME SECTION(DAY/HOUR...

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6-1 SPRING 2010 NAME______________________ BTNY 210 SECTION (DAY/HOUR)____________________ LABORATORY #6 (INTRODUCTION TO PLANT ANATOMY) Notes about lab this week: 1) We will be using microscopes extensively in today’s lab to observe plant anatomy. If you need to brush up on microscope use, please review Lab #2 before you come to lab. Start with an overview at low magnification and work your way up to higher magnifications. Center the area of interest, and focus at each magnification step. Remember to use only fine focus at higher magnifications. Feel free to ask your instructors if you need help adjusting your microscope at any time! 2) You will be using razor blades to make sections of fresh plant material. Generally speaking, thinner sections are best for observing fresh plant tissues. Always be aware of where your fingers are in relation to the razor blade, and never cut toward yourself! Band-aids and a first aid kit are located near the sink, if needed. Lab #6 Objectives: 1) become familiar with the structural organization from the whole plant down to individual cell types. 2) follow the developmental sequence that starts with the apical meristem followed by differentiation of primary meristematic tissues which further differentiate to primary tissues. 3) study the cell types that comprise the ground tissue system and their key distinguishing characteristics. 4) begin examining stem anatomy. A. REVIEW OF STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION PLANT ORGAN TISSUE SYSTEM TISSUE CELL TYPE Complexity of mature plant structure follows this basic scheme where the plant itself is the most complex and individual cell types are least complex. For instance: CARROT ROOT VASCULAR TISSUE SYSTEM XYLEM VESSEL ELEMENT 1. What are the 3 plant organs? 2. What are the 3 tissue systems?
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6-2 B. STEM APICAL MERISTEM AND PRIMARY MERISTEMATIC TISSUES After seed germination, the whole process of plant development begins at the primary apical meristems. These are areas where cell divisions are taking place to increase plant length. New cells produced at the apical meristems have no specific function until they undergo a process of maturation called differentiation. The first stage in the differentiation of new cells is the formation of the primary meristematic tissues. The primary meristematic tissues are immature precursors to the tissue systems. 1. What are the 3 primary meristematic tissues? (NOTE: you will use these 3 terms to label parts of the photomicrograph on the next page.) You will be examining a commercially prepared and stained section of the shoot apex of coleus. This section was made through the center of the shoot apex, parallel to the long axis of the stem. A living coleus plant is on your bench to give you a whole plant reference in relation to the section you are observing.
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