lecture13_2up - Object-Oriented Software Engineering...

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Object-Oriented Software Engineering Practical Software Development using UML and Java Chapter 11: Managing the Software Process Lecture 13 651 11.1 What is Project Management? Project management encompasses all the activities needed to plan and execute a project: • Deciding what needs to be done • Estimating costs • Ensuring there are suitable people to undertake the project • Defning responsibilities • Scheduling • Making arrangements For the work continued . ..
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• Directing • Being a technical leader • Reviewing and approving decisions made by others • Building morale and supporting staff • Monitoring and controlling • Co-ordinating the work with managers of other projects • Reporting • Continually striving to improve the process 652 What is Project Management? 653 11.2 Software Process Models Software process models are general approaches for organizing a project into activities. • Help the project manager and his or her team to decide: —What work should be done; —In what sequence to perform the work. • The models should be seen as aids to thinking , not rigid prescriptions of the way to do things. • Each project ends up with its own unique plan.
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654 The opportunistic approach 655 The opportunistic approach … is what occurs when an organization does not follow good engineering practices. • It does not acknowledge the importance of working out the requirements and the design before implementing a system. • The design of software deteriorates faster if it is not well designed. • Since there are no plans, there is nothing to aim towards. • There is no explicit recognition of the need for systematic testing and other forms of quality assurance. • The above problems make the cost of developing and maintaining software very high.
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656 The waterfall model 657 The waterfall model The classic way of looking at S.E. that accounts for the importance of requirements, design and quality assurance • The model suggests that software engineers should work in a series of stages. • Before completing each stage, they should perform quality assurance (veriFcation and validation). • The waterfall model also recognizes, to a limited extent, that you sometimes have to step back to earlier stages.
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Limitations of the waterfall model • The model implies that you should attempt to complete a given stage before moving on to the next stage —Does not account for the fact that requirements constantly change. —It also means that customers can not use anything until the entire system is complete. • The model makes no allowances for prototyping. • It implies that you can get the requirements right by simply writing them down and reviewing them. • The model implies that once the product is Fnished,
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2012 for the course CS 307 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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lecture13_2up - Object-Oriented Software Engineering...

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