11mems_1_6_f - 2.008 Design & Manufacturing II Spring...

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1 2.008-spring-2004 S.G. Kim 1 2.008 Design & Manufacturing II Spring 2004 MEMS I 2.008-spring-2004 S.G. Kim 2 March 10th ± Ask “Dave” and “Pat” ± Petty money up to $200, Goggles ± Plant tour, April 21, 22, sign up! By 4/2 ± Quiz 1 on March 17 th ± HW#4 due by Monday’s lecture ± 75 minutes (45 min) ± MEMS 1 today 2.008-spring-2004 S.G. Kim 3 Elephant vs. Ant ± Shock and impact ± Scale and form factor ± Load carrying capability ± Spider silk v.s. steel 2.008-spring-2004 S.G. Kim 4 Frog, Water Strider, Gecko 2.008-spring-2004 S.G. Kim http://robotics.eecs.berkeley.edu/~ronf /GECKO/Figures/Hierarchy3.jpg 5 Never try to mimic the nature. e.g. Biomimetic researches. DNA ~2-1/2 nm diameter Things Natural Things Manmade MicroElectroMechanical devices 10 -100 µ m wide Red blood cel s Pol en grain Fly ash ~ 10-20 µ m Atoms of silicon spacing ~tenths of nm Head of a pin 1-2 mm Quantum cor al of 48 iron atoms on copper surface positioned one at a time with an STM tip Cor al diameter 14 nm Human hair ~ 10-50 µ m wide Red blood cel s with white cel ~ 2-5 µ m Ant ~ 5 mm The Scale of Things -- Nanometers and More Dust mite 200 µ m ATP synthase ~10 nm diameter Nanotube electrode Carbon nanotube ~2 nm diameter Nanotube transistor 21 st Century Challenge Combine nanoscale building blocks to make novel functional devices, e.g., a photosynthetic reaction center with integral semiconductor storage The Microworld 0.1 nm 1 nanometer (nm) 0.01 µ m 10 nm 0.1 µ m 100 nm 1 micrometer ( µ m) 0.01 mm 10 µ m 0.1 mm 100 µ m 1 mil imeter (mm) 1 cm 10 mm 10-2 m 10-3 m 10-4 m 10-5 m 10-6 m 10-7 m 10-8 m 10-9 m 10-10 m Visible The Nanoworld 1,000 nanometers = Infrared Ultraviolet Microwave Soft x-ray 1,000,000 nanometers = Zone plate x-ray “lens” Outermost ring spacing ~35 nm Of ice of Basic Energy Sciences Of ice of Science, U.S. DOE Version 03-05-02 DOE 2001
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2 2.008-spring-2004 S.G. Kim 7 Transition: Micro to Nano ± 20 th Century - Microelectronics and Information Technology ± Semiconductors, computers, and telecommunication ± 21 st Century - Limits of Microsystems Technology --- Nanotechnology ± Moore’s law ± Hard disc drive John Bardeen, Walter Brattain, and Wil iam Shockley at Bel Laboratories, “First Transistor” 2.008-spring-2004 S.G. Kim 8 Moore’s Law Year of introduction Transistors 4004 1971 2,250 8008 1972 2,500 8080 1974 5,000 8086 1978 29,000 286 1982 120,000 386™ 1985 275,000 486™ DX 1989 1,180,000 Pentium® 1993 3,100,000 Pentium II 1997 7,500,000 Pentium III 1999 24,000,000 Pentium 4 2000 42,000,000 The number of transistors per chip doubles every 18 months. – Moore’s Law _ Rock’s Law 2.008-spring-2004 S.G. Kim 9 Microelectronics Technology To meet the Moore’s Law, line width(1/2 pitch) requirement 100 nm 2005 70 nm 2008 50 nm 2011 35 nm 2014 The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, 1999 No solution yet, nanolithography?
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2012 for the course MECHANICAL 2.008 taught by Professor Jung-hoonchun during the Spring '04 term at MIT.

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11mems_1_6_f - 2.008 Design & Manufacturing II Spring...

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