MIT22_081JF10_lec09b

MIT22_081JF10_lec09b - Robert N. Stavins nternational...

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Unformatted text preview: Robert N. Stavins nternational Climate Change Policy rom Copenhagen to Canc n, & Beyond Robert N. Stavins Albert Pratt Professor of Business and Government, Harvard Kennedy School Director, Harvard Environmental Economics Program Director, Harvard Project on International Climate Agreements The Global Climate Policy Challenge Kyoto Protocol came into force in February 2005, with first commitment period, 2008-2012 Even if the United States had participated, the Protocols direct effects on climate change would be very small to non-existent Science and economics point to need for a credible international approach Climate change is a classic global commons problem so it calls for international (although not necessarily global) cooperation Can the Kyoto Protocol Provide the Way Forward? The Kyoto Protocol has been criticized because: The costs are much greater than need be, due to exclusion of most countries, including key emerging economies China, India, Brazil, Korea, South Africa, Mexico (conservative estimate: costs are four times cost-effective level) The Protocol will generate trivial climate benefits, and fails to provide any long- term solution Short-term targets are excessively ambitious for some countries So, the Kyoto Protocol is too little, too fast Whether the Kyoto Protocol was a good first step or a bad first step, a next step is needed .. scientificall sound, economicall rational, and y y Searching for the Path Forward for Post-2012 The Harvard Project on International Climate Agreements Mission: To help identify key design elements of a scientifically sound, economically rational, and politically pragmatic post-2012 international policy architecture for global climate change Drawing upon research & ideas from leading thinkers around the world from: Academia (economics, political science, law, international relations) Private industry NGOs Governments Please see Aldy, Joseph E., and Robert N. Stavins. Architectures for Agreement: Addressing Global Climate Change in the Post-Kyoto World . Cambridge University Press, 2007. ISBN: 9780521692175. eveloping Insights for Post-2012 Climate Regime Summary for Policymakers (2009) builds upon lessons emerging from research initiatives 35 research initiatives in Europe, United States, China, India, Japan, & Australia Outreach with governments, NGOs, and business leaders throughout the world Complete book with 30 chapters on principles, architectures, and design elements published by Cambridge University Press, January 2010 5 Please see Aldy, Joseph E., and Robert N. Stavins. Post-Kyoto International Climate Policy: Summary for Policymakers . Cambridge University Press, 2009. ISBN: 9780521138000. Potential Global Climate Policy Architectures Targets & Timetables (as in Kyoto Protocol) Formulas for National Emission Targets Harmonized National Policies 6 Independent National Policies Portfolio of Domestic Commitments Linkage of National & Regional Tradable Permit Systems...
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MIT22_081JF10_lec09b - Robert N. Stavins nternational...

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