Fall 2010 Syllabus

Fall 2010 Syllabus - The George Washington University...

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Elliott School of International Affairs IAFF 180 Section 12: National Security, Foreign, and Intelligence Policy in the Wake of an International Crisis such as 9/11 Fall Semester 2010 3.0 Credits [1] Instructor: David Barton Office: 604-E, Elliott School building, 1957 E Street Office Hours: 12:45 to 1:45, Tuesdays and Thursdays Telephone: 703-237-6917 E-mail: [email protected] or [email protected] Classes will be held in room B16, 1957 E Street, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:10 to 12:25. Start date: 08/31/2010 [2] Course Description The course will focus on the national security, foreign policy, and intelligence process that the US government goes through in the wake of a severe international crisis such as 9/11. The course will explore the ways in which 9/11 challenged the prevailing historical and cultural awareness of international affairs related to terrorism, tested the government’s ability to assemble, by investigations and research, a common factual record of what happened, and prompted both the legislative and executive branches of government to undertake significant reforms. The writing of policy papers will be stressed as an important means of analyzing the intellectual content of the course and effectively expressing policy ideas. The course will look at: the background, context, and setting for the government and for the terrorist events of 9/11; the process by which the government investigations created a factual record of the 9/11 attack and recommended reforms; the ability of the US government, and specifically the intelligence community, to transform itself in appropriate ways to respond to this new global threat both before and after the attack; and, the effectiveness of the foreign policy, national security, and intelligence reform measures instituted and implemented post-9/11. As the course seeks to develop an understanding of the national security, foreign policy, political process, and intelligence implications of this particular terrorist event, we will analyze, develop, and write about policy from a number of different perspectives in order to highlight the theory and practice of the policy process surrounding a pivotal international crisis event such as 9/11. [3] Goal of Course At the end of the course students will have written at least three policy papers to demonstrate their knowledge of the numerous ways in which the national security, foreign policy, and intelligence processes become involved in responding to an international crisis such as 9/11. Students should have an understanding of how the executive and legislative branches of government respond to an international crisis and the policy process capabilities and mechanisms that the two branches of government have available. Students should be able to analyze the theory and practice of the policy process surrounding a pivotal international crisis event such as 9/11. Progress towards this course goal is measured in class participation and writing exercises throughout the term in addition to final writing projects. [4] Learning Outcomes
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This note was uploaded on 02/26/2012 for the course UW 1020-31 taught by Professor Pamelapresser during the Fall '11 term at GWU.

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Fall 2010 Syllabus - The George Washington University...

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