Paper Guidelines and Footnote Forms-2010 Revision - 16th edition - with Rubrics

Paper Guidelines and Footnote Forms-2010 Revision - 16th edition - with Rubrics

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Paper Guidelines Content : The most important element of the paper is the substance you wish to convey. It must be presented in a clear and organized manner. Your paper should be based on primary-source material (generally documents, but it could include artworks and other artifacts). It should make an original contribution to the historiography of the topic. Research : Verify your data carefully. Be particularly wary of any un-edited source (e.g., most web sites, for which you should require independent verification). You should begin by doing a search of secondary materials in the general area of your chosen topic. Include books, articles, and dissertations in your search. That will give you an idea of what has been covered. It may suggest questions that you would like to answer. It will also provide you with the beginnings of a bibliography. Mine the footnotes and bibliographies in the secondary sources for material that you can use. Be objective in presenting the material you discover in your research. Do not omit, without mention, sources that appear to contradict your conclusion. Analyze them and explain why they do not alter your result. Writing : In an assignment of this nature, the writing is important. If your paper is ponderous, people will not read it and you might have brilliant ideas, but no one will know. Write for an “ intelligent Martian ,” i.e., a person with college-level intellect, but no awareness of any of the specific facts relating to your topic. Never use technical terms, acronyms, or words that are not familiar to everyone without explaining their meaning. Clarity, effectiveness, spelling, grammar, and style will affect your grade. Proofread very carefully to catch typographical errors and to eliminate unclear or awkward passages. Use spell-check for a first review, but don't rely on it. You must proofread personally. Read for substance and then rewrite thoughtfully. Then proofread again. (It often helps to read your paper aloud quickly, as if presenting it to a conference, to catch confusing, unintended, and overly complicated language.) It is always a good idea to have another person read your paper, preferably one who will not spare your feelings by holding back constructive criticism. Structure and Organization: 1. Your paper must have an introduction and a conclusion. 2. It must be organized; in other words, your paragraphs should be ordered in a logical manner (e.g., chronological or thematic). Your paper should be organized around a thesis (a proposition you advance) or a question for which you provide an answer. Introduce your position early in the paper in a clearly written “thesis sentence.” 3. Arrange your paper so that you do not repeat material. Repetition is an indication of inadequate editing. You should be able to assume that your readers remember material once they have read it.
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This note was uploaded on 02/26/2012 for the course UW 1020-31 taught by Professor Pamelapresser during the Fall '11 term at GWU.

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Paper Guidelines and Footnote Forms-2010 Revision - 16th edition - with Rubrics

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