2444-100511

2444-100511 - 10-03 lecture 1 Slides are posted. The...

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Unformatted text preview: 10-03 lecture 1 Slides are posted. The lecture will be taped tomorrow (Thurs) and posted thereafter. The lecture will complete c16 I will proceed with c17. Chapter 17: Oxidation 2 A general class of reactions involves the gain or loss of two electrons, but the structural changes in the product are often measured by whether hydrogen or oxygen is gained or lost. Such reactions are known as oxidation and reduction reactions. Several functional group exchange reactions are classified as oxidations, including the conversion of Chapter 17: Oxidation 2 A general class of reactions involves the gain or loss of two electrons, but the structural changes in the product are often measured by whether hydrogen or oxygen is gained or lost. Such reactions are known as oxidation and reduction reactions. Several functional group exchange reactions are classified as oxidations, including the conversion of alcohols to ketones or aldehydes (an oxidation). To begin, you should know: 3 The structure and basic rules of nomenclature for alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, diols, ethers and carboxylic acids. (chapter 5, sections 5.6, 5.9 and chapter 16, sections 16.2, 16.5) The CIP rules for prioritizing substituents, groups and atoms. (chapter 9, section 9.3) Understand polarized bonds. (chapter 3, section 3.7) Understand !-covalent bonds. (chapter 3, section 3.3) Understand "-bonds. (chapter 5, section 5.1, 5.2) Brnsted-Lowry acids and bases. (chapter 6, section 6.2, 6.3, 6.4) Lewis bases and Lewis acids. (chapter 6, section 6.5) The acid-base properties of alcohols, alkenes, aldehydes and ketones. (chapter 6, sections 6.3, 6.4, 6.5) The fundamental reactions known for alkenes. (chapter 10, sections 102, 10.3, 10.4) Alkenes are converted to epoxides and to diols. (chapter 10, sections 10.5 and 10.7.A) Alkenes undergo oxidative cleavage with ozone. (chapter 10, section 10.7.B) The general reactions of carbonyl compounds. (chapter 16, sections 16.3 and 16.8) E2 type reactions. (chapter 12, sections 12.3 and 12.7) When completed, you should know: 4 Oxidation is defined as loss of electrons or gain of a heteroatom such as oxygen or loss of hydrogen atoms. Oxidation number is a convenient method to track the gain or loss of electrons in a reaction. Chromium (VI) reagents are powerful oxidants. The reaction of a secondary alcohol with chromium trioxide and acid in aqueous acetone is called Jones oxidation, and the product is a ketone. Chromium oxidation of an alcohol proceeds by formation of a chromate ester, followed by loss of the !-hydrogen to form the C=O unit. Jones oxidation of a primary alcohol leads to a carboxylic acid in most cases....
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2012 for the course CHEM 244 taught by Professor Jardin,j during the Fall '08 term at UConn.

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2444-100511 - 10-03 lecture 1 Slides are posted. The...

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