2444-102111

2444-102111 - QUIZ 5 Avg. 19.8 / 25 Stnd. Dev. 6.3 Chapter...

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Unformatted text preview: QUIZ 5 Avg. 19.8 / 25 Stnd. Dev. 6.3 Chapter 19. Reduction 2 If an oxidation involves the loss of two electrons, a reduction involves the gain of two electrons. The structural changes in the reduction product are often measured by whether hydrogen is gained and or if an oxygen atom is lost. To begin, you should know: 3 The basic rules of nomenclature for alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and carboxylic acid derivatives. (chapter 5, sections 5.6, 5.9) Bond polarization. (chapter 3, section 3.7) The CIP rules for prioritizing substituents, groups and atoms. (chapter 9, section 9.3) Lewis acids and Lewis bases. (chapter 6, section 6.5) Energetics and transition states. (chapter 7, sections 7.5, 7.6) Rotamers and conformations. (chapter 8, sections 8.1, 8.4) Chirality, enantiomers and diastereomers. (chapter 9, sections 9.1, 9.5) Alkene stereoisomers. (chapter 9, section 9.4) The fundamental reactivity of alkenes. (chapter 10, sections 10.2, 10.3, 10.4) The fundamental reactivity of carbonyl compounds. (chapter 16, sections 16.3 and 16.7; chapter 18, section 18.1) How to identify acyl addition reactions with strong and weak nucleophiles. (chapter 18, sections 18.3, 18.4, 18.5, 18.6, 18.7) The fundamentals of electron transfer for an oxidation. (chapter 17, section 17.1) The reagents used to oxidize an alcohol to an aldehyde or ketone. (chapter 17, section 17.2) To begin, you should know: 3 The basic rules of nomenclature for alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and carboxylic acid derivatives. (chapter 5, sections 5.6, 5.9) Bond polarization. (chapter 3, section 3.7) The CIP rules for prioritizing substituents, groups and atoms. (chapter 9, section 9.3) Lewis acids and Lewis bases. (chapter 6, section 6.5) Energetics and transition states. (chapter 7, sections 7.5, 7.6) Rotamers and conformations. (chapter 8, sections 8.1, 8.4) Chirality, enantiomers and diastereomers. (chapter 9, sections 9.1, 9.5) Alkene stereoisomers. (chapter 9, section 9.4) The fundamental reactivity of alkenes. (chapter 10, sections 10.2, 10.3, 10.4) The fundamental reactivity of carbonyl compounds. (chapter 16, sections 16.3 and 16.7; chapter 18, section 18.1) How to identify acyl addition reactions with strong and weak nucleophiles. (chapter 18, sections 18.3, 18.4, 18.5, 18.6, 18.7) The fundamentals of electron transfer for an oxidation. (chapter 17, section 17.1) The reagents used to oxidize an alcohol to an aldehyde or ketone. (chapter 17, section 17.2) Oxidation reactions of alkenes. (chapter 17, section 17.3) When completed, you should know: 4 A reduction is defined as the gain of electrons, or the gain of hydrogen atoms....
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2012 for the course CHEM 244 taught by Professor Jardin,j during the Fall '08 term at UConn.

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2444-102111 - QUIZ 5 Avg. 19.8 / 25 Stnd. Dev. 6.3 Chapter...

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