2444-112811

2444-112811 - Chapter 22 Enolate Anions Acyl Addition and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Chapter 22: Enolate Anions: Acyl Addition and Acyl Substitution 1 • There are other carbon acids, specifically involving the proton on an !-carbon in aldehydes, ketones or esters. • With a suitable base, these carbonyl compounds generate a new type of carbon nucleophile called an enolate anion. To begin, you should know: 2 • Nomenclature for aldehydes, ketones and acid derivatives. (chapter 5, section 5.9 and chapter 16, sections 16.2, 16.4) • The acid-base reaction, and factors that contribute to the position of the acid-base equilibrium. (chapter 6, sections 6.1, 6.3) • What contributes to acid strength. (chapter 6, section 6.3) • What contributes to base strength. (chapter 6, section 6.4) • The fundamentals of kinetic and thermodynamic controlled reactions. (chapter 7, sections 7.6, 7.7, 7.10) • The fundamentals of equilibrium reactions and factors that influence the position of the equilibrium. chapter 7, section 7.10 • The concept of resonance and resonance stability. (chapter 5, section 5.9.C) • Be able to draw resonance contributors and understand their significance. (chapter 5, section 5.9.C and chapter 21, section 21.3) • Rate of reaction. (chapter 7, section 7.11) • Rotamers and conformations. (chapter 8, sections 8.1, 8.4) • Know the reactions that generate ketones and aldehydes. (chapter 17, section 17.2 and chapter 21, section 21.3.C) • Keto-enol tautomerism. (chapter 10, sections 10.6.C, 10.6.D and chapter 18, section 18.5) • The E2 reaction. (chapter 12, sections 12.1, 12.2) • The SN2 reaction with alkyl halides. (chapter 11, sections 11.1, 11.2, 11.3) • Understand differences in nucleophilic strength. (chapter 11, section 11.3) • Formation of Grignard reagents and organolithium reagents. (chapter 15, section 15.1, 15.5) • Grignard reagents and organolithium reagents are strong bases. (chapter 15, sections 15.3, 15.5.B) To begin, you should know: 3 • Amines react as acids in the presence of a strong base. (chapter 15, section 15.5.B and chapter 6, section 6.4.A) • Acyl addition reactions of nucleophiles. (chapter 16, section 16.3 and chapter 18, section 18.1) • Acyl addition of organometallic reagents to aldehydes and ketones. (chapter 18, section 18.4) • The reaction of alcohols and amines with aldehydes and ketones. (chapter 18, sections 18.6, 18.7) • Know the reactions that generate carboxylic acids. (chapter 17, section 17.4 and chapter 20, section 20.2) • Know the reactions that generate acid derivatives. (chapter 20, sections 20.3-20.6) • Acyl substitution reactions. (chapter 16, section 16.8 and chapter 20, section 20.1) • Recognize electron releasing and withdrawing substituents. (chapter 3, section 3.7 and chapter 21, section 21.3) • How to identify a good leaving group. (chapter 11, section 11.2) • Know how to convert alkoxide anions to the corresponding alcohol via an acid-base workup. (chapter 5, section 5.7 and chapter 6, section 6.2 and chapter 18, section 18.1)workup....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/25/2012 for the course CHEM 244 taught by Professor Jardin,j during the Fall '08 term at UConn.

Page1 / 23

2444-112811 - Chapter 22 Enolate Anions Acyl Addition and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online