IgneousRox_for_Lab

IgneousRox_for_Lab - IGNEOUSROCKS (hotrocks) VOLCANICROCKS

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IGNEOUS ROCKS (hot rocks)
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VOLCANIC ROCKS (Extrusive Igneous Rocks)
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Basaltic  Lava: The dark color indicates high content in Fe (iron)  and Mg (magnesium). This type of composition is expressed with the term  mafic. Basaltic lava has a low viscosity, that  means it is very fluid  and runny.
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The ropy looking basalt lava to the right is called pahoehoe.   The lava still contains some gas. Basaltic lava that has lost most of its dissolved gas has a rough surface. It is called  aa .
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Lava flows on Hawaii This is the crater of one of the big shield volcanoes  on Hawaii Basaltic eruptions typically form shield volcanoes
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Andesitic  Lava: Andesites  are chemically different from basalts. Their lava and ash are lighter  in color because they are less  rich in Fe and Mg  (intermediate). Andesite volcanoes are more explosive, and their volcanoes have   steeper flanks. 
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IgneousRox_for_Lab - IGNEOUSROCKS (hotrocks) VOLCANICROCKS

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