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Rock_Groups

Rock_Groups - A finished thin section Fig A.6a,b © 2009...

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© 2009 W.W. Norton Rock Groups Some Rocks are Older Than Others
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© 2009 W.W. Norton Fig. A.CO Important for Classification of any rock: 1. 1. Texture Texture : --Small Scale, i.e., hand specimen or thin section a. Grain Size b. Grain Shape c. Arrangement/ Alignment of Grains --Large Scale, i.e., outcrop Layering, bedding, foliation 2. 2. Composition Composition a. Mineral Content b. Chemical Compounds (e.g., oxides) c. Chemical Elements
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© 2009 W.W. Norton Clastic vs. crystalline rock textures — 1. Clastic texture in sandstone, a sedimentary rock. Microscopic view “Exploded” view Hand sample Fig. A.1a
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© 2009 W.W. Norton Clastic vs. crystalline rock textures — 2. Crystalline texture in granite, an igneous rock. Microscopic view “Exploded” view Hand sample Fig. A.1b
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© 2009 W.W. Norton Describing grains in rock. Fig. A.4 Fine Coarse Equant Inequant Aligned inequant grains align with foliation Grain size comparison chart. Grain shape.
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© 2009 W.W. Norton Preparing a thin section. A rock saw. A rock “chip” on a slide.
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Unformatted text preview: A finished thin section. Fig. A.6a,b © 2009 W.W. Norton A petrographic microscope. A photomicrograph Fig. A.6c,d © 2009 W.W. Norton Cliffs in the Rocky Mountains, Colorado. Note the sedimentary layering = bedding. Fig. A.2a © 2009 W.W. Norton Road cuts are great to see the layering in rocks (Appalachians, New York) Fig. A.2b © 2009 W.W. Norton Streams are helpful, too! (Arizona) Fig. A.2c © 2009 W.W. Norton Cross bedding in sedimentary rock (Washington) Fig. A.5a Bedding Tilted bedding © 2009 W.W. Norton Sedimentary rock, closer to home (California) Fig. A.3b © 2009 W.W. Norton Up close and personal with an Igneous rock (Hawaii) Fig. A.3a © 2009 W.W. Norton Foliated metamorphic rock (Switzerland) Fig. A.3c © 2009 W.W. Norton Foliation in metamorphic rock. Fig. A.5b Foliation © 2009 W.W. Norton A marble quarry in Italy. Fig. A.AV © 2009 W.W. Norton An electron microprobe (UCSB’s) Fig. A.7...
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Rock_Groups - A finished thin section Fig A.6a,b © 2009...

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