Lecture_4_17_09 - Chapter22: TheTransitionElementsand...

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  1 Chapter 22:  The Transition Elements and  Coordination Compounds 
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2 Analysis of an Iron  Oxalato Complex 
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3 9B:% K + x+  Determination Use of ion exchange with H 3 O +  followed by  titration to determine K +   Further titration with NaOH solution breaks  down the iron oxalato complex to yield iron  (III) hydroxide Graph of titration data should therefore show  two equivalence points % of K +  and Fe x+  in the sample can be  determined by reaction stoichiometry
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4 Titration Steps After ion exchange, the solution is acidic. The first step involves the following: H 3 O + ( aq ) + OH - ( aq  H 2 O( l ) Adding additional base to the solution  results in the precipitation of Fe(OH) 3 Fe(C 2 O 4 ) y x- ( aq ) + 3OH - ( aq  Fe(OH) 3 ( s ) + yC 2 O 4 2- ( aq )
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5 9C: % Oxalate Determination Oxalate can be oxidized with permanganate  according to the following unbalanced equation:   aC 2 O 4 2- (aq) + bMnO 4 - (aq)     cCO 2 (g) + dMn 2+ (aq) Once balanced, enter sum of a+b+c+d in LON-CAPA pre-lab  Rather than carrying out the reaction at room  temperature, you will perform a “hot” redox titration –  Why? Correct for slight excess of permanganate by  performing a blank, then use reaction stochiometry to  find the % oxalate in your sample
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6 Properties of the Transition  Elements In addition to their commercial uses,  many  transition elements  have  biological importance.  In the first section of this chapter we will look at the general properties of the transition elements. In the last sections, we will cover the structure, naming and bonding of complex ions .
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7 Transition Elements and  Coordination Compounds The  transition elements  are defined as  those metallic elements that have an  incompletely filled d subshell or easily  give rise to ions with incompletely filled  d subshells. They have a number of characteristics, including high melting points and a multiplicity of oxidation states.
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8 Transition Elements and  Coordination Compounds The  transition elements  are defined as  those metallic elements that have an  incompletely filled d subshell or easily  give rise to ions with incompletely filled  d subshells. Sometimes chemists include the two rows of elements at the bottom of the periodic table; the lanthanides and the actinides .
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9 Transition Elements and  Coordination Compounds The  transition elements  are defined as  those metallic elements that have an  incompletely filled d subshell or easily  give rise to ions with incompletely filled  d subshells. Compounds of transition elements are frequently
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This note was uploaded on 02/26/2012 for the course CHEM 108 taught by Professor Dr.brennan during the Spring '09 term at Binghamton University.

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Lecture_4_17_09 - Chapter22: TheTransitionElementsand...

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