StokelyCarmichaelNotes

- Stokely Carmichael Black Power Carmichael challenges the academic institutions of America in claiming We wanted to say that this is a student

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Stokely Carmichael, “Black Power” Carmichael challenges the academic institutions of America in claiming, “We wanted to say that this is a student conference, as it should be, held on a campus, and that we're not ever to be caught up in the intellectual masturbation of the question of Black Power.” Carmichael claims, in line with post-war radical existentialism, that a man cannot condemn himself and survive. Using contemporary examples, he claims that this is why whites are reticent to admit their crimes against and guilt towards blacks. He states, “In a much larger view, SNCC says that white America cannot condemn herself. And since we are liberal, we have done it: You stand condemned. Now, a number of things that arises from that answer of how do you condemn yourselves. Seems to me that the institutions that function in this country are clearly racist, and that they're built upon racism. And the question, then, is how can black people inside of this country move?. .How can we begin to build institutions that will allow people to relate with each other as human beings? This country has never done that, especially around the country of white or black.” He claims the fight is not to gain integration, it is to attack white supremacy, “Now, then, in order to understand white supremacy we must dismiss the fallacious notion that white people can give anybody their freedom. No man can give anybody his freedom. A man is born free. You may enslave a man after he is born free, and that is in fact what this country does. It enslaves black people after they’re born, so that the only acts that white people can do is to stop denying black people their freedom; that is, they must stop denying freedom. They never give it to anyone.” Carmichael adds, “Now we want to take that to its logical extension, so that we could understand, then, what its relevancy would be in terms of new civil rights bills. I maintain that every civil rights bill in this country was passed for white people, not for black people. For example, I am black. I know that. I also know that while I am black I am a human being, and therefore I have the right to go into any public place. White people didn't know that. Every time I tried to go into a place they stopped me. So some boys had to write a bill to tell that white man, ‘He’s a human being; don’t stop him.’… I know I can live anyplace I want to live. It is white people across this country who are incapable of allowing me to live where I want to live. You need a civil rights bill, not me. I know I can live where I want to live.” Carmichael extends the scope of the impact of white power by arguing, “How can white people who are the majority -- and who are responsible for making democracy work -- make it work? They have miserably failed to this point. They have never made democracy work, be it inside the United States, Vietnam, South Africa, Philippines, South America, Puerto Rico. Wherever American has been,
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2012 for the course 790 376 taught by Professor Murphy during the Spring '09 term at Rutgers.

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- Stokely Carmichael Black Power Carmichael challenges the academic institutions of America in claiming We wanted to say that this is a student

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