Manners_Europe

Manners_Europe - The normative ethics of the European Union...

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Unformatted text preview: The normative ethics of the European Union International A airs : ( ) – © The Author(s). Journal Compilation © Blackwell Publishing Ltd/The Royal Institute of International A airs IAN MANNERS * Creative efforts: the normative power of the European Union World peace cannot be safeguarded without the making of creative e orts proportionate to the dangers which threaten it. Robert Schuman, declaration of May , Paris The creative e orts of the European integration process have changed what passes for ‘normal’ in world politics. Simply by existing as di erent in a world of states and the relations between them, the European Union changes the normality of ‘international relations’. In this respect the EU is a normative power: it changes the norms, standards and prescriptions of world politics away from the bounded expectations of state-centricity. However, it is one thing to say that the EU is a normative power by virtue of its hybrid polity consisting of supranational and international forms of governance; it is another to argue that the EU acts in a normative (i.e. ethically good) way. The focus of this article will be on the ways in which we might judge the normative ethics of the EU in world politics by criti- cally discussing the principles that it seeks to promote, the practices through which it promotes them, and the impact they have. The EU has been, is and always will be a normative power in world politics. This is a strong claim with a critical aim: to promote normative approaches to the study of the EU in world politics. This aim is built on the acknowledgement in critical theory that ‘theory is always for someone and for some purpose’, since ‘theory constitutes as well as explains the questions it asks (and those it does not ask)’. There is a simple temptation to attempt to analyse EU policy and influence in world politics empirically without ever asking why the EU is or is not acting, or how we might best judge what the EU should be doing in world politics. A * I am very grateful to Lisbeth Aggestam, Annika Bergman-Rosamond, Elizabeth Burdett, David Chandler, Chris Hill, Mary Martin, Hartmut Mayer and Mark Webber for their helpful comments. My focus of analysis is a holistic approach to the EU in world politics, including the international dimensions of internal policies, enlargement and external actions, rather than an exclusive focus on the EU’s ‘weakest link’, the CFSP/CSDP. Robert Cox, ‘Social forces, states and world order: beyond international relations theory’, Millennium : , , p. ; Catharine Hoskyns, ‘Gender perspectives’, in Antje Wiener and Thomas Diez, eds, European inte- gration theory (Oxford: Oxford University Press, ), p. ; Ian Manners, ‘Critical perspectives on European Union politics’, in Knud Erik Jørgensen, Mark Pollack and Ben Rosamond, eds, Handbook of European Union politics (London: Sage, ), p. . Ian Manners International A airs : , © The Author(s). Journal Compilation © Blackwell Publishing Ltd/The Royal Institute of International A airs...
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2012 for the course 510 392 taught by Professor Maxlikin during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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Manners_Europe - The normative ethics of the European Union...

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