Egenhofer_EUApproachForCopingWithGlobalEnvironmentalAndEnergyChallenges

Egenhofer_EUApproachForCopingWithGlobalEnvironmentalAndEnergyChallenges

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The EU Approach for Coping with Global Environmental and Energy Challenges Christian Egenhofer Senior Fellow, Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), Brussels; Senior Research Fellow, Centre for Energy, Petroleum and Mineral Law and Policy (CEPMLP), University of Dundee, Scotland/UK & Visiting Professor at the College of Europe (Bruges, Natolin/Warsaw), LUISS University (Rome) and Solvay Business School (Brussels) Paper 1 presented at the Conference Lessons from Europe Climate Change Policy & the European Experience Ruttgers Center for European Studies and Ruttgers School of Arts and Sciences 25 & 26 March, 2010 1 Based on: Egenhofer, C (2009), ‘The New EU Emissions Trading Scheme: A Blueprint for the Global Carbon Market?’, Harris J and N Goodwin (eds), 21 st Century Macroeconomics: Responding to the Climate Challenge . Cheltenham UK and Northampton MA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2009 (Chapter 11, pp. 246-263, and Egenhofer, C., A. Behrens and A. Georgiev (forthcoming), ‘EU Strategies for Climate Change Policy Beyond 2012’, in Brauch, Hans Günter Brauch; Oswald Spring, Úrsula; Grin, John; Mesjasz, Czeslaw; Kameri-Mbote, Patricia; Behera, Navnita Chadha; Chourou, Béchir; Krummenacher, Heinz (Eds.), Facing Global Environmental Change -Environmental, Human, Energy, Food, Health and Water Security Concepts . Berlin: Springer Hexagon Series on Human and Environmental Security and Peace, Volume 4
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Contents 1. Introduction . ............................................................................................................................. 3 2. The strategic approach: target setting and addressing energy security . ............................. 3 3. Implementation of the ’20-20 by 2020’ targets. ...................................................................... 5 4. The new EU ETS and the development of international carbon markets . .......................... 8 5. Competitiveness of industry and carbon leakage . ............................................................... 11 6. Climate change and developing countries . ........................................................................... 12 7. Conclusions. ............................................................................................................................. 13 References . ......................................................................................................................................... 14
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3 | 1. Introduction The European Union has traditionally felt at home in multilateral negotiations. This is no different for the environment. The EU as well as its member states have been actively promoting Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEAs). In the case of climate change the EU has found itself being catapulted into leadership after US President George W. Bush pulled out of the Kyoto Protocol. While few had bet at the time for the Kyoto Protocol to survive, active EU diplomacy ensured that Japan, Canada and Russia ratified the Protocol to enter into force in 2005. To
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Egenhofer_EUApproachForCopingWithGlobalEnvironmentalAndEnergyChallenges

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