MollenkopfHochschild_ImmigrantPoliticalIncorporation

- Immigrant Political Incorporation Comparing Success in the United States and Europe John Mollenkopf(CUNY Graduate Center and Jennifer

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Unformatted text preview: Immigrant Political Incorporation: Comparing Success in the United States and Europe John Mollenkopf (CUNY Graduate Center) and Jennifer Hochschild (Harvard University) March 25, 2009 Prepared for Ethnic and Racial Studies , special issue on Migrants and Minorities Mobilization: Exclusion and Engagements in Europe edited by Davide Per (Nottingham University) and John Solomos (City University), forthcoming 2009 2 ABSTRACT: Despite reasons to expect otherwise, immigrant political incorporation appears to be proceeding more rapidly in the United States than in many Western European states. We provide evidence to support that contentious statement and reasons to explain it. For many analytic purposes, states of Western Europe should be disaggregated; nonetheless, four features of the United States distinguish its capacity to incorporate newcomers into the political arena from that of most European countries. First, the United States was created through immigration, voluntary and otherwise, whereas European states came into being mainly through consolidation of resident populations. That history shapes public attitudes toward immigration policy and immigrants themselves. Second, the United States has a long history of domestic racial subordination and a recent history of efforts to overcome it; European states have no comparable experience. Third, social welfare systems and school systems differ across the two continents in ways that make incorporation slightly easier for immigrants to the United States., Finally, the American political system of nomination and election is more open to insurgent candidacies , and therefore makes election of newcomers to office more likely. While hardly a model of immigrant political incorporation, The United States has been relatively successful compared with its own past and with the situation in most Western European states Keywords: immigrants, politics, electoral representation, anti-immigrant sentiment, assimilation. 3 At least two reasons suggest that immigrants and their children might do better at entering the political realm in many Western European states than in the United States. Europe lacks the United States tradition of deep and broad racial subordination. Many European states also provide social citizenship rights independent of nationality, thus buffering immigrants and their children from the worst economic outcomes. In fact, however, Europe may be creating new forms of distinction and discrimination, such that second generation political incorporation may prove harder, slower, and less complete than in the United States. That, at any rate, is what we think the evidence suggests so far, and what we seek to demonstrate in this article....
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2012 for the course 360 290 taught by Professor Dankelemen during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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- Immigrant Political Incorporation Comparing Success in the United States and Europe John Mollenkopf(CUNY Graduate Center and Jennifer

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