32011 - Chronic Disease Surveillance using Administrative...

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Chronic Disease Surveillance using Administrative Data Lisa M. Lix, PhD Souradet Shaw, MA MANITOBA CENTRE FOR HEALTH POLICY University of Manitoba, Canada
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Lecture Outline 1. What is chronic disease surveillance? 2. Why use administrative data for chronic disease surveillance? 3. Constructing case definitions 4. Validating case definitions 5. An example: Diabetes 6. Conclusions
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1. What is Chronic Disease Surveillance? Chronic diseases are: “…not prevented by vaccines or generally cured by medication, nor do they just disappear. To a large degree, the major chronic disease killers… are an extension of what people do, or not do, as they go about the business of daily living.” (CDC, 2004)
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Surveillance is: “…the ongoing systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of outcome-specific data for use in planning, implementing, and evaluating public health practice…” (Thacker & Berkelman, 1988). Chronic disease surveillance involves activities related to the ongoing monitoring or tracking of chronic diseases.
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2. Why Use Administrative Data for Chronic Disease Surveillance? Administrative data are usually collected by government for some administrative purpose (e.g., paying doctors or hospitals), but not primarily for research or surveillance.
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The databases are often population based, so important population subgroups are not missed. Comparisons between disease cases and non-cases. Trends over time can often be monitored. Advantages of Using Administrative Data for Surveillance
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Limitations of Other Data Sources Vital statistics data Clinical registries Survey data
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Limitations of Administrative Data Administrative data are collected for purposes of health system management and provider payment, and not for chronic disease surveillance. Thus, it is important to assess their validity for surveillance
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3.
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32011 - Chronic Disease Surveillance using Administrative...

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