Dead Sea Scrolls Paper

Dead Sea Scrolls Paper - Heaton 1 Mitchell T. Heaton Father...

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Unformatted text preview: Heaton 1 Mitchell T. Heaton Father Basil Yender, O.S.B. Honors Theology I 11 May 2009 The Dead Sea Scrolls The most famous archaeological find of the twentieth century was the uncovering of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Initially stumbled upon by a Bedouin from the Ta’amireh tribe, the Dead Sea Scrolls were found along the northwest shore of the Dead Sea. After the first discovery of the Scrolls in 1947, the area of Qumran became an archaeological hotspot. Archaeologists searched the caves along the northwest side of the Dead Sea. The Scrolls were found in a total of eleven caves, each numbered in a similar fashion. The last discovery of the Scrolls came in 1956 and added to an already growing library of texts (“About the Scrolls” 1). Scholars generally concur that the Dead Sea Scrolls are the remains of a library that belonged to an ancient Jewish sect—the Essenes. Most of the manuscripts were written in Hebrew but there are a few which were written in Aramaic and Greek. The manuscripts were written on various materials including animal skins, were written in Aramaic and Greek....
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This note was uploaded on 02/26/2012 for the course GENERAL 101 taught by Professor None during the Spring '12 term at Aurora University.

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Dead Sea Scrolls Paper - Heaton 1 Mitchell T. Heaton Father...

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