CLAS 131 Notes 8

CLAS 131 Notes 8 - Gods and Mortals Hesiod, Works...

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Unformatted text preview: Gods and Mortals Hesiod, Works & Days What significance do the stories of Prometheus & Pandora and of the Five Races have within the context of Works & Days and of Hesiods work as a whole? What can we say about the way Hesiod envisioned the respective places of gods and humans in the cosmos? Overview of Works & Days Context: advice to his shiftless brother Perses, against whom Hesiod has complaints- Lines 43-45- Lines 53-55- Lines 447-457 Perses situation and faults seem to change over the course of the poem A real situation? Who knows? More important: His complaints about his brother Perses, real or made up, provide the literary framework for presenting this poem of traditional wisdom about how to live 1-20: Introductory hymn to Muses 21-57: Two kinds of Strife (Eris); Perses and the kings 58-128: Why Life is Hard, Pt. 1: Prometheus and Pandora 129-234: Why Life is Hard, Pt. 2: The Five Ages 235-245: The Hawk and the Nightingale 246-429: General advice: justice instead of violence, hard work instead of idleness 430-683: The Farmers Year (Works) 684-768: Seafaring 769-844: General social and religious precepts 845-928: Days of the month (Days) Why Life is Hard, Pt. 1: Prometheus and Pandora Compare Works & Days...
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CLAS 131 Notes 8 - Gods and Mortals Hesiod, Works...

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