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CLASS NOTES - ENG101-How to Ask Good Questions: Inquiry +...

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ENG101-How to Ask Good Questions: Inquiry + Stasis Theory EXERCISE If you had no clue what the Internet was, what are 5 questions you would ask an expert in order to understand the Internet as comprehensively as possible? How does the information travel so rapidly? Is the Internet accessible to everyone or does it have limitations? Can it cause harm? What can be accomplished by using it? How does it work? Forming Good Questions Definition: What is it? Cause/Effect: Risks? Benefits? Consequences? When and how? Value: Why use it? Is it a good or bad thing? Is it useful? Action: What can I do about it? How do I use it efficiently? Does it need to be regulated, promoted, etc.? Jurisdiction: Who controls it? Who should control it? Who should take action in regard to this? STASIS THEORY: Categories or questions to pose in understanding an issue or understanding where there is a debate in an issue. Uses: Develop questions for research Focus argument Analyze argument
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04:19 It is vital to distinguish between the main argument and the supporting claims EVIDENCE Strategies Citation—tells us where the information is coming from Direct Quotes (exigence) Variety [of sources] “Hard” Evidence (facts, studies vs. opinions) REPRESENTING MySpace is a ghetto. And moving from MySpace to Facebook is like white flight (Boyd 13).
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ENG101- Writing an Effective Narrative - Introduction
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ENG101- Writing an Effective Narrative - Details/Vivid Language—show time and place “show don’t tell” - Difference in style/movement/texture Inquiry in Academia Questions whose answers could matter to some slice of the general public Questions with multiple, complex answers PUBLIC ISSUES: Censorship Hate Fraud Privacy NARRATIVE + INQUIRY – PITFALLS No scattered narrative Show us a continuous story in 1-2 sentences Have a clear begging, climax, and end No clear public issues Issue too broad or too narrow Don’t give yourself too much/too little research “Texting is making my brother dumb” BAD “The effects of texting” TOO BROAD “The effects of texting on literacy” GOOD “The effects of texting on writing skills of 8 yr. olds” TOO NARROW
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ENG101- Writing an Effective Narrative Questions too broad or narrow Ask questions that can be answered convincingly in 3-4 pages Questions asked rapid fire Narrate question asking Essay doesn’t reestablish exigence Remind reader why its important to look at/ ask questions about the issue
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Summarizing the Work of Others- Representing Fairly 04:19 Good summary starts with accurately reading Read a source twice if necessary Underline key points Identify the main idea and supporting arguments If something is unclear, ask: “How does this connect to the main idea?” Give credit where credit is due Explicitly connect the author with his/her ideas Represent the author’s ideas fairly (even if you think they are wrong) Pay particular attention to your word choices when paraphrasing
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This note was uploaded on 02/27/2012 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '09 term at Maryland.

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CLASS NOTES - ENG101-How to Ask Good Questions: Inquiry +...

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