INF1520-2011-6-E-1 - UNIVERSITY EXAMINATIONS...

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Unformatted text preview: UNIVERSITY EXAMINATIONS UNIVERSITEITSEKSAMENS UNISA ‘t‘ university oi south africa IN F1 520 ( 483837) Maleune 2011 IN F1203 (492225) RIN 1 203 ( 495043) RIN152K (470719) HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION l Duration 2 Hours 100 Marks EXAMINERS : FIRST MRS B CHIMBO SECOND PROF JH GELDERBLOM This paper consusts of 23 pages plus mstruotions for completion of a mark-reading sheet This examination paper remains the property of the University of South Africa and may not be removed from the examination room. Instructions: . Questions must be answered on the mark reading sheet. 2. Section A must be answered by all students. 3. Section B must be answered only by students who are registered for INF1520 for semester 1 of 201 l and by students writing the RIN120B exammation. 4. Section C must be answered only by students who are writing a supplementag examination for INF 1208. Please complete the attendance register on the back page, tear off and hand to the invi ilator. 2 INFl 520/1NF1208/RIN1208/RIN152K May/June 201 l SECTION A (all students should do this section) Question l Wthh of the followmg definitlons of HCI are acceptable“? A HCI IS a ‘set of processes, dlalogues, and actlons through whlch a human user employs and 1nteracts w1th a computer’ B HCl IS a ‘dlSClplme concerned With the des1gn, evaluatlon, and Implementatlon of mteractlve computlng systems for human use and Wlth the study of major phenomena surroundmg them” C HCI IS “the study of people, computer technology, and the ways these 1nfluence each other’. D HCI 1s concerned w1th studying and 1mprov1ng the many factors that 1nfluence the effectlveness and effimency of computer use Optlons 1 A, B, C and D 2 A, B and D only 3 B, C and D only 4 A and B only 5 A, B and C only Question 2 The concept of relates to the way humans sense Informanon, usmg hearing, sight and touch 1 ergonomlcs 2 human factors 3 physmlogy 4 perceptlon 5 cogmtlon Question 3 The ‘computer’ 111 human-computer Interactlon IS defined as 1ncluding A general desktop computer A spacecraft cockpit An embedded computlng devrce A process control system All of the above metam— [TURN OVER] 3 INF1520/INF1208/RIN120B/RIN152K Maleune 2011 Question 4 A typ1cal computer user population usually does not ex15t because of d1f‘ferences in' A Age B Ha1r colour C Natlonallty Options: 1 Only A 2 Only B 3 Only A and B 4 Only A and C 5 Only B and C Question 5 The effectweness, efficiency and sat1sfact1on with which Spoolfied users achleve specified goals 1n part1cular environments, 15 the definitlon of given by Internat1onal Standards Organ1sat1on (ISO) leamabrhty access1b1l1ty 1 2 3. user experience 4 1nteractiondes1gn 5. usability Question6 The term refers to the perceived and actual properties of an object, prlmarlly those fundamental properties that determine Just how the object could pOSSlbly be used 1 maintenance 2 mappmgs 3 Vlsibllity 4 affordance 5 None of the above [TURN OVER] 4 INFl SZO/INF1208/RINIZOB/RIN152K May/June 201 1 Question 7 Whlch of the followmg are dlfferences between knowledge 1n the head and the world‘7 A Knowledge of the world is easrly retrrevable whenever V1s1ble or audlble wh1lst knowledge 1n the head is difficult to retrleve B Knowledge 1n the head IS assoc1ated w1th h1gh ease of use at first encounter and knowledge 1n the world w1th low ease of use at first encounter C Knowledge 1n the world tends to be less effic1ent than knowledge 1n the head D Learnlng 15 not requlred for the knowledge in the world, but 1nf0rmat10n 1n the head requires learnlng Opt1ons: 1 All of the above 2 A, C and D 3 A, B and D 4. A, B and C 5 B, C and D Question 8 Whlch of the followmg statements 1s/are TRUE about colour perceptlon‘? A B C Congenltal colour defic1ts produce changes in perception that reduce the Vlsual effectlveness of certaln colour combinatmns People w1th colour defic1ts generally see less contrast between colours than someone with normal VISIOD nghtenlng dark colours and darkemng light colours W111 1ncrease the v1sual acce531b111ty of a des1gn Optlons 1 2 3 4 5. A only B only A and B A and C B and C. [TURN OVER] 5 INFl520/INF1208/RIN120B/RIN152K May/June 20“ Question 9 Wthh of the followmg statements are absolutely TRUE“? A Vlsual display un1ts (VDUs) Slgmficantly mcrease the r1sk of rad1at10n-related 1llnesses B Computer use does not damage your eyes or eyes1ght, but mIght make you aware of eXIStmg defects C Computer use Induces eplleptlc attacks Optlons 1 A only 2 A and B only 3 B and C only 4 B only 5 A and C only Question 10 Wh1ch rows 1n the table below correctly 1nd1cate overt and covert factors of 1nternat1onal1sat1on‘? Overt Factors Covert Factors anglble Intanglble Dates, calendars, tlme format Depends on culture or ‘spec1al knowledge’ ymbols, colours and functlonahty Punctuatlon, wrltten d1rect1on ound and graph1cs Un1ts of measures and currency ddress formats and character sets Metaphors and mental models Opt1ons 1 A and B only 2 A and C only 3 A, B and E 4 A, B, C and E 5 A, B, C, D and E [TURN OVER] 6 INFl520/INF1208/R1N120B/RIN152K May/June 20] 1 Question 11 When equ1pment 1s deSIgned w1th more possible act1ons than 1t has controls, 1t 15 111(er to lead to errors 1 assoc1ative actlvatlon 2 capture 3 descr1ption 4 mode 5 None of the above Question 12 Users have d1fferent degrees of 1nforrnat1on about 1nteract1ve systems Expertise develops through the followmg levels 1 Sk111-based level, rule-based level and knowledge-based level 2 Rule—based level, knowledge—based level and sklll-based level 3 Knowledge-based level, rule-based level and sk1ll—based level 4 Sk1ll-based level, knowledge-based level and rule-based level 5 Rule-based level, sk1ll-based level and knowledge-based level Question 13 DeSIgners should. A DeSIgn for the average user B Think of themselves as typical users C Know when to stop mak1ng further changes to a product Opt1ons 1 A, B and C 2 A and B 3 A and C 4 A only 5 C only Question 14 What 15 the max1mum number of 1tems that a person can generally keep 1n short-term memory? 1 2 3 4 5 \D‘HJONU'I-P [TURN OVER] 7 INFI 520/1NF1208/RIN120B/RIN1 52K May/June 201i Question 15 Norman distinguishes between slips and mlstakes Which of the followmg statements are TRUE? A Slips result from automatic behaviour B Mistakes result from consmous deliberations. C M1stakes result from lack of attention. D Shps Show up most frequently 1n skilled behavrour Opt1ons 1 A, B, C and D 2 A, B and C 3 A, B and D 4 A and B 5. B and D Question 16 Cons1der the followng definltions I descrlptmns A Generality relates to support for the user to extend specific knowledge within and across other similar applicauons. B. Pred1ctab1llty entalls support for the user to determine the effect of future action based on past 1nteract10n hlstory C Consistency involves likeness 1n input-output behavrour ansmg from snmlar Situations or task objectlves D DIX and colleagues div1de the1r design pr1nc1ples into three categories, namely Learnab111ty principles, Flex1bi11ty pr1nc1ples and Robustness principles. E High-level princ1ples are appllcatlon-specific and do not need much interpretation. Whlch are accurate definitions / statements? 1 All of the above 2 Only B, C and E 3 Only A, B, C and D 4 Only A, B, C and E 5 Only B, C and D [TURN OVER] 8 INF1520/INF1208/RIN120B/RIN1 52K May/June 2011 Question 17 Whlch of the followmg are advantages of usmg questlonnaires for evaluatlon? A A large number of users can be 1ncluded in the evaluatlon. B It IS more flex1ble than interv1ews. C. It IS less labour 1ntensive than interviews D. Results can be analysed rigorously Options 1 A and D 2 A, C and D 3 B, C and D 4 B and C 5 B and D. Question 18 You are dr1v1ng through dlfficult traffic and the children in the back of your car are talking very loudly. In an attempt to qulet them down you turn down the volume of the car radio (whlch Isn’t even sw1tched on) Thls IS an example of a(n) error 1 associative activatlon 2 data-driven 3. descrlptlon 4. mode 5 loss-of—activatlon. Question 19 The followmg are strengths of graphical interaction 1 V131b111ty; cross-cultural communlcation, 1ncreased intu1t1ve appeal due to impact and animation 2 V1s1bi11ty, cross—cultural communlcatlon, 1mpact and anlmatlon, the use of icomc symbols. 3 Visiblllty, cross-cultural communication, improved aesthetlcs, the use of iconic symbols 4 Visiblllty; conveys more information, increased mtuitive appeal due to impact and animation. 5. V151b1hty, graphical images make it easier for users to extract necessary information, increased mtuitive appeal due to 1mpact and animation [TURN OVER] 9 INF1520/INF1208/R1N120B/RIN152K Maleune 2011 Question 20 Which of the following statements about des1gn standards ls/are TRUE? A Standards for mteractrve system des1gn are usually set by national or International bodies B Provrdes a common termmology, so that de51gners know that they are dlscussing the same concept. C. Increases training needs to ensure that knowledge can be transferred between standardlzed systems D. They make it possrble to desrgn without taking the target user’s SklllS and characterlsncs into account Options All of the above. A, B and C only A and B only A, B and D only A only LhflhLAJN—d Question 21 thh of the followmg statements are true? Desrgners should de51gn by puttlng themselves in the shoes of the user. A good way to determine the usability of a product rs to test the demgn on typrcal users Aesthetlcs (that 1s, how artful 1t appears) should be a prlorlty in generating a desrgn The client who requires the de31gn 1s not necessarlly the user In such a case the chent’s requirements are more 1mportant than the user’s 5 All the above statements are true LwPH Question 22 When an action 15 constrained so that farlure at one stage prevents the next step from occurring, we call 1t a/an Logical connectlon Desrgn philosophy Forcmg functlon Natural mappmg Affordance. m-PSJJMI—t [TURN OVER] 10 INF1520/INF1208/R1N120B/1UN152K May/June 2011 Question 23 Whrch of the followmg statements are true about feedback? A Feedback 15 1nformat1on that Is sent back to the user about what actlon has been performed B When the letter ‘A’ appears on the screen after you press the ‘A’ key on the keyboard, 1t 13 a form of feedback C Experts need more 1nformat1ve feedback than nov1ces D Sound should not be used as a feedback mechamsm as 1t usually annoys people Opt10ns I All the above statements are true 2 A, B and D 3 A, C and D 4 A and B only 5 A, B, and C Question 24 Whrch of the followmg are, accordlng to ShneIderman, aspects which must be characterlsed 1n order to recogmse the d1vers1ty of users‘? A Usage profiles Task profiles B C Typical errors D Language use E Interaction styles Opt10ns 1 All of the above 2 C, D and E 3 A, C and D 4 A, B and E 5 B, C and E Question 25 Summatrve evaluation Demonstrates whether or not people can use the system in their own work env1ronment Tends to be exploratory Does not focus on specrfic Issues Helps to guIde decrs1ons durmg the development of an mteractrve system Takes place only dunng the desrgn stage U’l-bWMfl [TURN OVER] 11 lNF1520/INF1208fRIN120B/RIN152K May/June 2011 Question 26 Whlch of the followmg does NOT apply to scenarlo-based evaluation“? 1 It derrves measurable observatlons that can be analysed 2 It forces des1gners to 1dent1fy key tasks 1n the requ1rements’ elchtation stage 3 D1fferentde31gn opt1ons can be evaluated agamst a common test su1te 4 It helps to 1dent1fy and test hypotheses early in the development cycle 5 Dlrect compansons can be made between alternat1ve desrgns Question 27 Whlch of the followmg aspects work agamst evolutlonary deSIgn9 A New vers1ons of a product are already under desrgn before the old ones are m use B Adequate mechamsms for collecting and feedmg back experiences of customers do not eXISt C New ‘1mproved’ vers1ons of a product come out that do not evolve gradually from the good propert1es of prev1ous one D Des1gners have to make somethmg d1fferent and 1nd1v1dual — even if another company has already produced the perfect vers1on of the product Opt10ns l A, B, C and D 2 B, C and D 3 A, C and D 4 B and D 5 D only Question 28 When there 15 a natural mapping between the spat1al layout of components and the things they affect, (such as posmonlng the left-Justlficatlon icon left of the r1ght-Just1f1cat10n won on the tool bar) 1t 15 a Cultural constramt DeSIgn constraint 1 2 3 LogICal constramt 4 Phys1cal constralnt 5 SemantIC constralnt [TURN OVER] 12 INF1520/INF1208/R1N120BleN152K May/June 201! Question 29 When a driver stops at a red traffic llght, he 15 adhermg to a constramt cultural semantlc 1 2 3 log1cal 4 physrcal 5 None of the above Question 30 A relationship exrsts between what a user wants to do and what results from the acuon When thIS 15 a close relationshlp, 1nd1cated by the use of phys1cal analogles or cultural standards, It 18 called 1 Causahty 2 V1s1b111ty 3 Affordances 4 Natural mappmg 5 Log1cal p1ausrb111ty Question 3] refers to the level of support the user rs glven m deterrmnmg successful achlevement and assessment of goals 1 Leamabllrty 2 F lexbellty 3 Robustness 4 Leamabrlrty and flexrblhty 5. Flextb1llty and robustness Question 32 Wthh of the followmg statements 15 altogether TRUE? Wrth careful deSIgn, human error can be englneered out By makmg the dlfferent modes clearly v131ble, des1gners can av01d mode errors Data-dr1ven errors are tnggered by Internal thoughts or assoc1atrons instead of external data If systems are well deSIgned and Implemented, operators need not be tramed to use them LII-bulk)“ Poor workmg envlronments can never be blamed for errors m system use [TURN OVER] l3 lNFl 520/INF1208/RIN120B/RIN152K Mayilune 2011 Question 33 Whrch one of the following questions does NOT address any of Nielsen’s heuristics? 1 Does the interface cater for people from different cultures‘7 2 Is there a clear match between the system and the real world? 3 Does the user have control when needed and are they free to explore when necessary? 4 Does the user interface display consistency and adherence to standards? 5 Does the interface rely on recognition rather than on recall? Question 34 Which of the f0110w1ng statements apply to long-term memory? A It has lower capacity B It has a short retention period. C It is slow to access Options 1 C only 2 A only 3 A and C 4 B and C 5 A, B and C Question 35 Perception is influenced by: A Max1mum and minimum detectable levels of, for example, sound B Nationality C Background nOise D Fatigue and biological rhythms Options 1 A, B and C 2 A, C and D 3 A and B 4 A and C 5 A, B, C and D [TURN OVER] 14 INF1520/INF1208/RIN12OB/RIN152K May/June 20” SECTION B (Only for students who registered for INF1520 in 2011. All other students should skip to page 19.) Question 36 The advantages for somety of being able to model complex systems Include A Improved the understanding of pandemics, contagion and global health trends B Better predlctron of the impact of cllmate change on the envrronment, the economy and on humans 1n general C Better prediction of natural disasters and their impact so that effectlve response plans can be set up D Improved social 1nteractlon through social networking web Sltes Optlons 1 All of the above 2 A and B only 3 B, C and D 4 A, B and C 5 A and C only Question 37 Interfaces that comblne different ways of mteractmg, such touch, sight, sound and speech, are referred to as 1 RObOtIC mterfaces 2 Multlmodal interfaces 3 Multimedia interfaces 4 Shareable interfaces 5 Tangible Interfaces Question 38 Which of the followmg IS not one of the act1v1tles of Interactlon desrgn as described by Preece, et al (2007‘)‘? Identlfymg needs and establishing user requ1rements Developmg alternatlve deSIgns accordlng to the requlrements. Budding prototypes of the desrgns so that they can be assessed Evaiuatmg the designs and the user expenence Deploymg the system “AWN—i [TURN OVER] 15 lNFlSZO/INFI208/RIN120B/RIN152K May/June 2011 Question 39 Reasons for de81gnlng systems that are acceSSIble to people w1th drsab111t1es, are A Comphance w1th regulatory and legal requ1rements B Exposmg more people to new technology C General Improvement of des1gn Options 1 A and B only 2 B and C only 3 A, B and C 4 A only 5 B only Question 40 Preeoe et al dlstlngulsh between user expenence goals and usabIhty goals Wh1ch of the followmg characterlstlcs do they aSSOCIate w1th user experIence goals‘7 Engaging Safe Supportlve of creatmty Challengmg roamed)» Memorable Opt10ns All of the above A, B. C and D A, B, C and E A, C and D A, C and E MLWN—t Question 4] Whloh computer was concewed/developed by Charles Babbage? Arlthmetlc machme Analyt1cal 611ng Emac Tabulatmg machlne All of the above UILWNF" [TURN OVER] 16 INFI520/lNFlZO8/RIN120B/RIN152K May/June 2011 Question 42 The lntemet was or1g1nally a 1 Local area network (LAN) at MIT 2 Code-crackmg network during World War II by the U S Defense Department 3 A network cooperatlvely created by several large hardware and software companles 4 A small experimental research network called ARPANET 5 A M1crosoft product that qutckly became too big for the company to control Question 43 Wthh of the followmg statements about the Emall and the WWW are altogether TRUEr7 A EmaII and the World W1de Web (WWW) were the two major developments bu11t on the Internet B The term 'World W1de Web” refers to the same thlng as the term ‘Internet’ C Untll late 19805 the growth m electronlc mall was largely restr1cted to academlc commumtles, 1 e umversmes and colleges D There are more than 230 m1ll1on web srtes and l 73 bllhon Internet users worldwrde Opt1ons l A and B only 2 A, C and D only 3 A and C only 4 A, B, C and D 5 A, B and D only Question 44 May or transformations 1n computmg that w111 affect the field of HCI 1n the next decade are A Increasmg dependence on technology B The changmg notlon of “the 1nterface’ C Hyper-connect1v1ty D Increased creat1v1ty through technology Opt10ns l A, B, C and D 2 A, B and C only 3 B, C and D only 4 A, C and D only 5 C and D only [TURN OVER] l7 INF1520/INF1208/RINIZOB/RIN152K May/June 2011 Question 45 A computer program that rephcates itself in order to damage the resources on a computer is a. 1 Time bomb 2 TrOJan horse 3 Worm 4 Reproductwe program 5 Spam Question 46 Whlch of the followmg statements about attention and memory are altogether TRUE9 A Attentlon lS 1nfluenced by the way information is presented as well as by people’s goals B Memory cons1sts of a number of systems that can be dlstmgulshed in terms of then cognitive structure as well as on their respectwe roles m cognitive process C Most people have the same attent1on span D There is general consensus on how memory is structured. Optlons l A and B only 2 A and D only 3 C and D only 4 A, B and C only 5 A, B, C and D. Question 47 Some people have a tendency to perceive an object separately from the context and assign Obj ects to categories The same group of people generally uses a sequennal reading pattern These people are regarded as 1 Organisationally minded 2 Analytically minded 3 Perceptually restricted 4 Hohstically minded 5 Systematic. [TURN OVER] l8 lNFlSZO/INFI208/RINIZOB/RIN152K May/June 20] 1 Question 48 The ‘d1gltal d1v1de’ can best be described as The difference between technologically trained and technologically unlnformed users 2 A robust system developed by the CSIR and the Department of Sc1ence and Technology to glve people 1n rural areas of South Afnca access to computer technology 3 Informat1on deprivation experienced by older people 4 The d1v151on between the real world and the virtual world of the Internet 5 Unequal access to technology that separates people into those who have 1t and those who do not Question 49 Wthl‘l of the followmg 15 NOT a funct1on of prototypes? They prov1de a structure that IS s1m11ar to some aspects of a fatnlllar ent1ty, but that also has its own behav1our and propertles. 2 They act as a communicatlon medium w1thm the des1gn team — the members can test their dlfferent ideas on the prototype and the team can discuss these ideas 3 The act as communication medium between desrgners and users or cl1ents 4 They provnde a way to test out different des1gn ideas 5 They help des1gners to choose between alternative des1gns Question 50 Which of the following are problems of computer supported cooperative work (CSCW)‘? A It may be difficult for users to know exactly who else 18 usmg the system B Contentlon — that 18, when two or more users want to gam access to a resource that cannot be shared C Interference — that is, when one user frustrates another by gettmg 1n his or her way D Lack of anonym1ty or pr1vacy. E Identlty theft Opt10ns 1 A, C and D 2 A, B and C 3 A, B, D and E 4. B, D and E 5 A, B and D [TURN OVER] 19 lNFlSZO/INFIZOS/RINIZOB/RINISZK May/June 2011 SECTION C (only for students who are writing a supplementary examination for INF1208) Question 36 Preece’s model of HCI has four components, namely' 1 Psychology, physmlogy, socrology, phllosophy. 2 People, env1ronment, technology, t1me 3 Psychology, physwlogy, somology, computer selence 4 People, work, env1ronment, technology 5 None of the above Question 37 Some users belleve that an ATM card holds Informatlon about the balance of their account, while it actually only holds mformatlon about the PIN number that gives access to your account records, whlch are stored on a central, remote computer These users have formed an Incorrect Desrgn model Mental model 1 2 3 System 1mage 4 Interpretation 5 System model Question 38 Whlch of the followmg statements regarding computer system desrgners and users are TRUEO A Interface designers must understand their user population. B Younger users are more flexrble than older users. C Older users are more tolerant than younger users D Cultural aspects such as the language used by the target user population should be conSIdered during Interface des1gn Options 1 All of the above 2 B, C and D only 3 B and C only 4 A, B and D only 5 A and D only [TURN OVER] 20 [NF] 520/INF1208/R1N120B/R1N152K Mayllune 20” Question 39 The followmg are common types of menu-based interactlon styles A Context menus Drop-down menus B C lcomc menus D Scrollmg menus E Text-based menus Options‘ 1 B, C, D and E 2 A, B and E only 3 B, D and B only 4 A, D and E only 5 A, B and D only Question 40 Wlth regard to the act1v1t1es dunng interface des1gn, requirements elzcztanon Involves Burldmg the system to the requ1red standard ngh—level representation of a des1gn The more detalled select1on of part1cular optlons from amongst a range of alternat1ve techniques Identlficatlon of the vanous pr10r1t1es that dlfferent partles w111 have regardlng new pleces of software 5 All of the above guano—- Question 41 The paradox of technology, accordmg to Norman, relates to the facts that A Technology 51mpllfies life by prov1d1ng more functlons in each devrce B In splte of 1ts advantages, technology comphcates life by makmg dev1ces harder to learn and use C It makes rich people richer and poor people poorer D It can be used as an excuse for poor deSIgn Opt10ns 1 A, B and C 2 A and B 3 B and C 4 A and C 5 A, B and D [TURN OVER] 21 INF1520/INF1208/RINlZOB/RINISZK May/June 2011 Question 42 Dlgltal watches constltute an example of Takmg control away from the user Prowdmg mental a1ds to help the user w1th the task Making something v131ble that IS normally 1nv151ble Changmg the nature of the task None of the above LJ‘I-bbJNr— Question 43 The fact that we can use the word ‘clockwrse’ to 1nd1cate a spec1fic dlrectlon of c1rcular movement IS an example of 1 A cultural constralnt 2 Standard1zat10n 3 A natural mappmg 4 Informatlon 1n the world 5 Rote learning Question 44 The mam tools used for are observation, 1nterv1ews and documentation 1 task analySIS 2 task des1gn 3 system testmg 4 interface deSIgn 5 web deSIgn Question 45 When you make a hotel reservation or conference reg1strat1on onhne, you are entering your personal details as Input us1ng a Textual command Text-based menu Form-filhng 1nterface GUI DII’CCt manipulatlon Interface (J‘ILLHNI— [TURN OVER] 22 lNFl520/INF1208/RIN120B/RIN152K May/June 2011 Question 46 The best way to integrate HCI aspects into the system development llfe cycle 15 to 1 Identlfy user requrrements early in the development cycle, so that there 18 less need for code modification Ignore them 3 ‘Mix’ user interface concerns in With w1der development act1v1t1es Handle l-ICI 1n the later stages of desrgn, and ‘massage’ the appllcation functionality into a form readily 30083811316 by the user 5 Do all of the above Question 47 Cons1der the followmg statements A Direct manipulation interfaces are a narrowly defined form of graphical interface B Graphical interfaces may fail if the end-user cannot make the correct assoc1ations With the 1mages, icons and symbols used C Signs and icons used 1n ‘mternationalization’ for transport, travel and labelling, are Increasmgly being used in interface deSIgn D. GUI IS an acronym for ‘graphical user 1nterface’ E Graphical interfaces are always the best for nov1ce users Which are true? 1 All of the above 2 A, B, C and D only 3 A, B, D and E only 4 A, C and D only 5 None of the above Question 48 The gulf of executlon refers to the difference between and when performing an action execution, evaluation tasks; actions the user’s model, the de31gn model 1 2 3 the user’s expectation, actual state of affalrs 4 5 the user’s intentions; the allowable actions [TURN OVER] 23 INF] 520/INF1208/RIN1203/RIN152K May/June 20l 1 Question 49 Two ways to treat creeplng featurlsm are 1 Avmdance and modulanzatlon 2 Orgamzatlon and reductlon 3 Modularlzatlon and reductlon 4 Restramt and 51mp11fication 5 Simpllficatlon and restralnt Question 50 Evaluatlon aspect of human actlon as defined by Norman starts wrth Settmg a goal Our perceptlon of the world 1 2 3. Executlng an actlon sequence 4 An Intention 5 None of the above. © UNISA 2011 ‘ID. UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA U N I EXAMINATION MARK READING SHEET PART 'I (GENERAL/ALGEMEEN) DEEL 1 STUDY UNIT 0 g PSY‘IOfl-K STUDIE EENHEID hv FSWDO-X [9] PAPER NUMBER INITIALS AND SURNAME VOORLEITERS EN VAN .-.. a DATE OF EXAMINATION DATUM VAN EKSAMEM - --——---- PART 2 (ANSWERS/ANTWOORDE) DEEL 2 EXAMINA‘HDN CENTRE KEG PRETORIA} ‘5 unwersuy of soulh alnca EKSAMEN-MERKLEESBLAD UNIVERSITEIT VAN SUID-AFRIKA L:1:: f:i::L VRAESTELNDMMER EKSAMENSENTRUM (8V PHETORIA) v -- STUDENT NUMBER umnu: PAPER NO STUDENT HUMMER UNIEKEP STEL NR (0) £0] [0] [01:0] r0] m :1] m m m m For use by examination Inwgnlator [21 r21r21 :2; r2) r21 [31 r J [:1 VII’ gebrunk deur eksamenopsnener [4} [ 1 [5] J :5] [6] :5: 1:6) [61 [7'] r71 r71 ’71 :3) :31 (B) :31 [91 (91 £91 r9] IMPORTANT BELANGRIK I USE ONLY AN HB PENCIL TD COMPLETE THIS SHEET 1 GEHHUIK SLEGS N HE I’OTLOOD OM HIERDIE BLAD TE VOLTOOJ 2 MARK LIKE THIS '1“ 2 MERK ASVOLG F2- 3 CHECK IHAT YOUR INITIALS AND SURNAME HAS BEEN FILLED IN CORRECTLY 3 KONTRULEER DAI U VODRLETTERS LN VAN REG INGLVUL lb 4 ENTER YOUR STUDENT NUMBER FROM LEFI'TO RIGHT 4 VUL U STUDENTENOMMER VAN LINKS NA REGS IN 5 CHECK THAT YOUR STUDENT NUMBER HAS BEEN FILLED IN CORRECTLY 5 KDNTROLEER DAT U DIF KDRRFKTE STUDENTENOMMER VI-RSTFIEK HET 6 CHECK THAT THE UNIQUE NUMBER HAS BEEN FILLED IN CORRECTLY 6 KONTROLEER DAT DIE UNIEKE NDMMER REG INGEVUL IS 7 CHECK THAT ONLV ONE ANSWER PER QUESTION HAS BEEN MARKED 7 MAAK SEKER DAT NET EEN ALTERNATIEF PER VRAAG GEMERK IS 8 DO NOT FOLD 8 MOENIE VOU NIE UNISA P1'112 ...
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INF1520-2011-6-E-1 - UNIVERSITY EXAMINATIONS...

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