2012GeomechLecture1 (1)

2012GeomechLecture1 (1) - GLY 4930/5932: Geomechanics 1....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
GLY 4930/5932: Geomechanics 1. Introductions: Who am I? Who are you? 2. Syllabus. 3. What is Geomechanics? 5. Applications of Geomechanics to: Engineering (Civil, Mining), Natural Hazards, Seismology, Volcanology, Structural Geology
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
GLY 4930/5932: What is Geomechanics? From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Geomechanics (Greek prefix geo meaning earth; and mechanics) is the study of the [mechanical] behavior of soil and rock . The two main disciplines of geomechanics are soil mechanics and rock mechanics . The former deals with the behaviour of soil from a small scale to a landslide scale. The latter deals with issues in geosciences related to rock mass characterization and rock mass mechanics, such as tunneling and earth drilling. Some of geomechanics relates to geotechnical engineering. Modern developments relate to seismology, continuum mechanics, and discontinuum mechanics.
Background image of page 2
GLY 4930/5932: What is Geomechanics? From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Soil mechanics is a discipline that applies the principles of engineering mechanics to soil to predict the mechanical behavior of soil. It is important in several branches of engineering such as civil engineering , geotechnical engineering , geophysical engineering and engineering geology . Some of the basic theories of soil mechanics are the basic description and classification of soil, effective stress , shear strength , consolidation , lateral earth pressure , bearing capacity , slope stability , and permeability . Foundations , embankments , retaining walls , earthworks and underground openings are all designed in part with theories from soil mechanics.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
GLY 4930/5932: What is Geomechanics? From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Rock mechanics is the theoretical and applied science of the mechanical behaviour of rock and rock masses; it is that branch of mechanics concerned with the response of rock and rock masses to the force fields of their physical environment. Rock mechanics itself forms part of the broader subject of geomechanics which is concerned with the mechanical responses of all geological materials, including soils. Rock mechanics, as applied in mining , petroleum, and civil engineering practice, is concerned with the application of the principles of engineering mechanics to the design of the rock structures generated by mining, drilling, reservoir production, or civil construction activity, e.g. tunnels , mining shafts, underground excavations, open pit mines, oil and gas wells, road cuts, waste repositories, and other structures built in or of rock. It also includes the design of reinforcement systems such as rock bolting patterns.
Background image of page 4
GLY 4930/5932: Applications of Geomechanics (from La Torre di Pisa, 2001) How do we describe and quantify the mechanical properties of rock and soil that have bearing on the capacity of engineering foundations?
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
GLY 4930/5932: Applications of Geomechanics (from Budyo, 2000) How do we describe the mechanical interaction of engineering structures and Earth Materials?
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 81

2012GeomechLecture1 (1) - GLY 4930/5932: Geomechanics 1....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online