Nanda_Chapter12moodle

Nanda_Chapter12moodle - Chapter 12 Power, Conquest, and a...

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Chapter 12 Power, Conquest, and a World System
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Motivators for European Expansion Christianize the world. Find a wide variety of wonders, both real and imagined. Amass great wealth.
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Developments Aiding Expansion Rise of a banking and merchant class Growing population New ship design that was better at sailing into the wind Diseases carried by Europeans to native populations
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European Expansion and Disease Almost every time Europeans met others who had been isolated from the European, African, and Asian land masses, they brought death and cultural destruction in the form of microbes. In many instances, virtually the entire native population perished of imported diseases within 20 years.
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Pillage To strip an area of money, goods, or raw materials through the use of physical violence or the threat of such violence Europeans used violence to take money, goods, or raw materials from indigenous peoples. Mines were placed under European control.
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Examples of Pillage In 1531, Pizarro captured the Inca emperor Atahuallpa and received $88.5 million in gold and $2.5 million in silver (current value) as ransom. After the British East India Company came to power in India, it plundered the treasury of Bengal, sending wealth back to investors in England.
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Forced Labor Europeans forced peoples whose lands they conquered and their own lower classes to work for them. They practiced African slavery on a larger scale than any people before them.
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Forced Labor Between the end of the 15th century and the end of the 19th, 11.7 million slaves were exported from Africa to the Americas. More than 6 million left Africa in the 18th century alone.
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Economic Effects of Slavery The use of slave labor was extremely profitable for both slave shippers and plantation owners. Slave labor created continuous warfare and impoverishment in the areas from which slaves were drawn.
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Monoculture Plantations Monoculture plantations specialized in the large-scale production of a single crop for sale to distant consumers. They created the demand for slaves.
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Monoculture Plantations Through the 18th century, sugar was the most important monoculture crop. British consumption of sugar increased some
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This note was uploaded on 02/27/2012 for the course ANTH 1003 taught by Professor Demovic during the Fall '07 term at LSU.

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Nanda_Chapter12moodle - Chapter 12 Power, Conquest, and a...

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