QMCh1Statistics

QMCh1Statistics - 1 of 3 Statistics and the Wavefunction...

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1 of 3 Statistics and the Wavefunction Let's review some elementary statistics about random variables that can assume discrete values. Suppose we make many repeated measurements of a random discrete variable called x. An example of x is the mass, rounded to nearest kg, or the height, rounded to the nearest cm, of a randomly-chosen adult male. We label the possible results of the measurements with an index i. For instance, for heights of adults males, we might have x 1 =25 cm, x 2 = 26 cm, etc (nobody is shorter than 25 cm). The list {x 1 , x 2 , . .. x i ,... } is the called the spectrum of possible measurement results. Notice that x i is not the result of the i th trial (the common notation in statistics books). Rather, x i is the i th possible result of a measurement in the list of all possible results. N = total # of measurements. n i = # times that the result x i was found among the N measurements. Note that where the sum is over the spectrum of possible results, not over the N different trials.
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This note was uploaded on 02/27/2012 for the course PHYSICS 3220 taught by Professor Stevepollock during the Fall '08 term at Colorado.

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QMCh1Statistics - 1 of 3 Statistics and the Wavefunction...

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