Homework1 - Name: David Skidmore Assignment: Homework 1 1....

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Name: David Skidmore Assignment: Homework 1 1. Review the Course Description (Syllabus, Policies, and Description) document on Carmen. a. What formats are acceptable for HW and lab submissions? Acceptable submission formats for homework are PDF, Microsoft Word and plain text. Labs are to be submitted only in text formatted source format. b. What is the course policy on late submissions? No late assignments are accepted. 2. We understand what the number 110.011 (decimal) represents. What value does 101.101 (binary) represent? 3. What is 125 (decimal): a. in base 2? b. in octal? c. in hexadecimal? d. in base 20? e. written using BCD? 4. What is -24 (decimal): a. in 8-bit signed magnitude? b. in 8-bit 2's complement? c. written using BCD? 5. Convert the following two 4-bit numeric representations, 0110 and 1011, in the encoding indicated. Add the decimals values together and convert back to the given representation. a. Convert to decimal from signed magnitude representations, add the decimals together, and encode the result. b. Convert to decimal from 2's complement representations, add the decimals together, and encode the result. 6. Show how to add the following decimal numbers using 5-bit two's complement. Show your work, including the binary numbers you are adding, the answer in binary and the answer converted to decimal. a. 8 + 5 b. 7 + -5 c. -11 + -7 7. What is the range (maximum and minimum representable values) of: a. a 15-bit signed magnitude representation? The maximum and minimum values are 16,383 and -16,383 respectively. b. a 15-bit 2's complement representation? The maximum and minimum values are 16,383 and -16,384 respectively. 8. Give the least number of binary digits (bits) needed for an unsigned (simple binary) representation of the decimal number 2,347. 9. Why might the terms "kilobyte", "megabyte", "gigabyte", and their various abbreviations be considered ambiguous and potentially confusing? The SI prefixes were designed with a base-10 system in mind. Consequently, kilo-, mega- and gigadesignate 103, 106 and 109 respectively. However, within the computer and telecommunication industries these terms are commonly used in base-2 systems such that kilo-, mega- and giga- become 210, 220 and 230 respectively. As of 2000 the IEC has released a standard alternative system specific to base-2 systems using terms such as kibi- (Ki), mebi- (Mi) and gibi- (Gi) to address this issue. ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/27/2012 for the course CSE 360 taught by Professor Sam during the Winter '11 term at Ohio State.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online