business anthropology

business anthropology - An analysis of the Beijing 2008...

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An analysis of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games; an anthropological and business perspective on sponsorship relationship between BOCOG and EF Education First. Page 1
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0.0. ABSTRACT. 1.0. INTRODUCTION. 1.1. Beijing’s 2008’s Olympic bid. 1.2. EF Education First. 1.3. Considerations of business and anthropology. 1.4. Personal Considerations. 2.0. SPONSORSHIP PROCESSES. 2.1. The theory. 2.2. Exposure to the message. 2.3. Decoding the message. 2.4. An Anthropological consideration. 2.5. Process of acceptance or rejection. 2.6. Attitude Modification. 2.7. Sustainability of attitude changes. 2.8. Change in purchasing behaviour. 3.0. CONCLUSION. 3.1. Why sponsor? 3.2. The process of sponsorship; business considerations. 3.3. Problems encountered; anthropological. 3.4 The success of sponsorship. 4.0. ORIGINAL MEDIA REPORT. Page 2
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5.0. BIBLIOGRAPHY. 0.0. ABSTRACT. The 2008 Olympic Games were hosted by the Peoples Republic of China in Beijing. As with every Olympics, the event received sponsorship from a variety of source, one being EF Education First. The field of business in which EF provides a service is English language education. The company was named the official language-training service for the 2008 Games. The theory of the structure of the sponsorship process was applied to this example, examining the ways in which EF conducted business with their Chinese partners, highlighting any issues during the proceedings, analysing them from an anthropological view point. EF based their sponsorship campaign around the alteration of cognitive thought and emotion projection of the product, with the aim to increase brand awareness and purchasing behaviour. Problems were observed such as the political controversy surrounding China’s Human Rights in Tibet. These issues were over come with acute awareness of Chinese culture and business etiquette coupled with strategic marketing. The final success of the campaign has been difficult to establish, but early indications in the form of brand awareness surveys have shown to be positive. Page 3
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1.0. INTRODUCTION 1.1. Beijing’s 2008’s Olympic bid. On the 13 th July 2001, Beijing was officially announced as having won the bid to host the 2008 Olympic Games by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) (Owen, 2005). This would be only the third time an Asian country had hosted the games, and the very first time The Peoples Republic of China had played host, only narrowly missing out on the bid in 2000 to Sydney by 2 votes (Ong, 2004). China viewed the games as an excellent opportunity on two fronts; firstly as a chance to improve Beijing’s infrastructure and a rationale to allocate the significant funds to do so, and secondly as a method to aid its international prestige, increasing morale both domestically and internationally (Smith & Himmelfarb, 2007). In 2003, China estimated a cost of US$14.257 billion (Owen, 2005), with only, US$1.14 billion to be spent on new construction with a further US$0.25 billion on renovation (Ong, 2004).
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business anthropology - An analysis of the Beijing 2008...

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