catalytic receptors

catalytic receptors - What are catalytic receptors? Give...

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What are catalytic receptors? Give examples of two receptor families. For one of these describe the possible outcomes of activation of these receptors in the body. How is this exploited in the clinic? Catalytic receptors are DIMERIC cell surface proteins with a single transmembrane domain that separates an extracellular ligand binging site from intracellular enzymatic activity. These receptors are activated predominantly by peptide hormones such as insulin, epidermal growth factor, platelet derived factor and atrial natriuretic factor. The catalytic part of the receptor functions as a protein kinase, targeting tyrosine residues. But pGC activates GC and metabolises GTP to GDP rather than having kinase activity. Particulate Guanylate Cyclase (pGC) (ANP) receptors are one such family. They have an extracellular peptide binding site. Uroguanylin is mainly in enterochromaffin cells of duodenum and proximal small intestine. Guanylin is present in the goblet cells of the colonic epithelium and is secreted into the lumen of intestine and blood. Insulin (Protein Tyrosine Kinase)
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2012 for the course CHEM 4385 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

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catalytic receptors - What are catalytic receptors? Give...

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