Survival of the Fittest

Survival of the Fittest - Survival of the Fittest Applied...

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Survival of the Fittest Applied to Human Kind Herbert Spencer (1851) In common with its other assumptions of secondary offices, the assumption by a government of the office of Reliever-general to the poor, is necessarily forbidden by the principle that a government cannot rightly do anything more than protect. In demanding from a citizen contributions for the mitigation of distress--contributions not needed for the due administration of men's rights--the state is, as we have seen, reversing its function, and diminishing that liberty to exercise the faculties which it was instituted to maintain. Possibly, . .. some will assert that by satisfying the wants of the pauper, a government is in reality extending his liberty to exercise his faculties. . .. But this statement of the case implies a confounding of two widely different things. To enforce the fundamental law--to take care that every man has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other man--this is the
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Survival of the Fittest - Survival of the Fittest Applied...

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