Chp 14 Descriptive Statistics Part 1 (student)-1

Chp 14 Descriptive Statistics Part 1 (student)-1 -...

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Descriptive Statistics Chapter 14
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Research Process
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Why are statistics important?
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Analyzing Data Descriptive Statistics (Chp 14) Summarize and describe the data Inferential Statistics (Chp 15) Allows the researcher to determine whether  differences in groups are due to the effects of the  IV or more likely due to chance
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Notation X = mean N = number of participants  = sum Σ s ²= variance s= standard deviation SS= sum of squares  _
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Overview Frequencies  Central Tendency Variability Z-scores
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Analyzing Nominal and Ordinal  Data Example: Kristin conducted a study to see if expert  testimony affects juror decisions in a murder case.   One hundred participants read a case and decide  on a verdict.   The case either contained or did not  contain expert evidence. (N = 100) What is the IV? What is the DV?
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Frequency First, Kristin can calculate the  frequency : the  number of times a category occurs Results (N = 100) Not Guilty: 62 people Guilty: 38 people The frequency of “not guilty” verdicts was 62
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Percentages Frequencies can also be expressed in terms of  percentages To calculate percentages, divide the number of times the  category occurred by the total number of participants Results (N = 100) Not Guilty: 62 people Guilty: 38 people 62/100 = 62% of the participants gave a “not guilty”  verdict 38/100 = 38% of the participants gave a “guilty” verdict
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Relative Frequency Then, she can calculate the  relative frequency
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Chp 14 Descriptive Statistics Part 1 (student)-1 -...

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