Hesiod(1) - Hesiod: from Works and Days The Greek poet...

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Hesiod: from Works and Days The Greek poet Hesiod, writing in the 8 th century B.C.E., addressed the everyday realities of ordinary Greeks in Works and Days . Along with the Iliad and Odyssey of Homer, his writings are the oldest works of Greek literature. Hesiod includes thoughts about his own life and labor in the fields as well as fables and allegories. In the following excerpt, he discusses the importance of hard work and how wealth should be gained. Both gods and men are angry with a man who lives idle, for in nature he is like the stingless drones who waste the labour of the bees, eating without working; but let it be your care to order your work properly, that in the right season your barns may be full of victual. Through work men grow rich in flocks and substance, and working they are much better loved by the immortals. Work is no disgrace: it is idleness which is a disgrace. But if you work, the idle will soon envy you as you grow rich, for fame and renown attend on wealth. And whatever be your lot, work is best for you, if you turn your misguided mind away from other men's property to your work and attend to your livelihood as I bid you. An evil shame is the needy man's
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Hesiod(1) - Hesiod: from Works and Days The Greek poet...

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