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Oxides - 1 Oxides Oxides can be grouped according to their...

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1 Oxides Oxides can be grouped according to their chemical formulas, although members of each group may not necessarily be related through isomorphism or even genetically. Three main groups are recognized: I- Oxides of the formula XO 2 1- Rutile: A very common accessory mineral in igneous and metamorphic rocks. Is also common as a detrital mineral. 2- Cassiterite: (SnO 2 ): A mineral that develops in pegmatites and high T hydrothermal deposits. Commonly associated with wolframite, molybdenite, and arsenopyrite in veins of quartz. 3- Pyrolusite (MnO 2 ): Forms in the sedimentary environment by the oxidation of other Mn – bearing minerals. Common on the sea floor, in bogs, and on lake bottoms. Also found in veins with quartz. 4- Uraninite (UO 2 ): Occurs in granites and pegmatites, as well as high T hydrothermal veins. II- Oxides of the formula X 2 O 3 All members of this group crystallize in the trigonal system, and are either tabular or prismatic. Hematite and ilmenite exhibit extensive (but incomplete) solid solution (Fig. 1).
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