UBC POLI 101 (6) Megaconstitutional Politics

UBC POLI 101 (6) Megaconstitutional Politics - POLI 101...

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POLI 101, Winter 2001, 2nd Term Dr. Fred Cutler www.politics.ubc.ca/fcutler/teaching/POLI101 1 UBC POLI 101 Canadian Politics Mega(?) -Constitutional Politics: In Search of Unity Quebec Nationalism, Aboriginal Self-Determination, Regionalism All the usual Canadian preoccupations! http://www.politics.ubc.ca/fcutler/teaching/POLI101 POLI 101, Winter 2001, 2nd Term Dr. Fred Cutler www.politics.ubc.ca/fcutler/teaching/POLI101 2 Background to Mega-Constitutional Politics • Nationalism: Links membership in a cultural or ethnic community to the legitimate existence, recognition, and independence of a political community • Can Canadians “consent to form a single people”? • Canadian Nationalism? Weak? – British / Imperial Connection – English Canada was British! – Pull of / Push against the USA – defining ourseves in opposition to US • Competing Identities: – Quebec Nationalism – Aboriginal Nations – Provincial Communities / Regionalism POLI 101, Winter 2001, 2nd Term Dr. Fred Cutler www.politics.ubc.ca/fcutler/teaching/POLI101 3 Context: Repatriation of the Constitution • Bringing the constitution back to Canada began a process of mega-constitutional politics – re-fashioning, re-imagination of the political community • So the question is defining the nation and putting that into practice through the constitution: Russell asks: “ Can Canadians become a sovereign people • Canada begins to tackle this question as the Quiet Revolution develops in Quebec (around 1960) • Initially involves provinces – especially Quebec • But expands in the late 1970s to include – aboriginal people, – women’s groups, – ethnic/multicultural associations: • Everyone wants a say in re-defining the political community As they should!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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POLI 101, Winter 2001, 2nd Term Dr. Fred Cutler www.politics.ubc.ca/fcutler/teaching/POLI101 4 Visions of Canada Grounding ‘visions’ of the community provide stories that justify and legitimize different constitutional outcomes: 1. Two Nations French and English (non-territorial) Quebec and Rest of Canada 2. Equal Provinces (confederation) Push for intrastate federalism – Senate Reform And restriction of federal spending power Some opposition to Charter because decisions apply nationally 3. Three Nations Aboriginal peoples as founding nations Requires a “third order of government” 4. Multiculturalist Founding contributions of many ethno-cultural groups, none superior 5. Individualist – Community of Equal Individuals All equal members of the political community – no ‘group rights’ POLI 101, Winter 2001, 2nd Term Dr. Fred Cutler www.politics.ubc.ca/fcutler/teaching/POLI101 5 Society and Nationalism in Quebec • French (Catholic) society in Quebec is 400+ years old • Politics a compromise between the Catholic Church, English Economic Interests, and a minimal Quebec State… lasted
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This note was uploaded on 02/27/2012 for the course BUSINESS 101 taught by Professor All during the Spring '09 term at McGill.

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UBC POLI 101 (6) Megaconstitutional Politics - POLI 101...

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