Factoring Trinomials

Factoring Trinomials - Factoring Trinomials Jackie M....

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Unformatted text preview: Factoring Trinomials Jackie M. Robertson In the box listed below, the section labeled Problem shows the possible signs found in the trinomials you will factor. For example, problem one, y 2 + 9 y + 18 has (+) (+) meaning the first sign in the problem is positive and the second sign is positive. In problem three, y 2 + 3 y- 40 has (+) ( - ) meaning the first sign in the problem is positive and second sign is negative. The second column, labeled Factored Signs, tells you what the signs of the factored problem will be. In problem one, both signs are positive y + 3 ( 29 y + 6 ( 29 . In problem three, one sign is positive and one sign is negative. The third column identifies if you should add or subtract the factors of the end term (c) for x 2 + bx + c trinomials to obtain the middle term (bx) of the problem. For example, problem one has an end term of 18; the factors of 18 are listed below. Since the signs in the factor form of the problem are both positive, you will add the two factors of 18 that will give you the value 9 in the middle term of the original problem. How do you know if you have all of the factors of the end term? You start by dividing the end term by 1, then 2, then 3, then 4 and so on, looking for the numbers that will divide the end term evenly. When you start repeating the factors, such as 3 6 and then 6 3 as in problem one, you have found all of the factors of the end term. If you do not find two factors, when added or subtracted, that give you the numerical value of the middle term, then the problem is prime and cannot be factored. Now lets look at each of the problems listed below individually. We will discuss the difference of the two types of trinomials x 2 + bx + c and ax 2 + bx + c , a 1 ....
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This note was uploaded on 02/27/2012 for the course MATH 119 taught by Professor Wilde during the Fall '08 term at BYU.

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Factoring Trinomials - Factoring Trinomials Jackie M....

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