17 - Probability: The proportion of times the event occurs...

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Probability: The proportion of times the event occurs in many repeated trials of a random phenomenon. Random samples eliminate bias from the act of choosing a sample, but they can still be wrong because of the variability that results when we choose at random. If the variation when we take repeat samples from the same population is too great, we can’t trust the results of any one sample. Chance behavior is unpredictable in the short run but has a regular and predictable pattern in the long run. Probability describes what happens in very many trials, and we must actually observe many trials to pin down a probability. We call a phenomenon random if individual outcomes are uncertain but there is nonetheless a regular distribution of outcomes in a large number of repetitions. The probability of any outcome of a random phenomenon is the proportion of times the outcome would occur in a very long series of repetitions.
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This note was uploaded on 02/27/2012 for the course STAT 121 taught by Professor Patticolling during the Winter '11 term at BYU.

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17 - Probability: The proportion of times the event occurs...

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