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Chapter_14_Redox_Part_2_

Chapter_14_Redox_Part_2_ - Chapter 14 Part 2...

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Chapter 14: Part 2 Oxidation-Reduction reactions ---
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Oxidation reduction: underlying concept Oxidation reduction reactions involve transfer of electrons from an electron donor to an electron acceptor -----
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Higher the electronegativity, the greatest attraction for electrons Figure 8.05 ---
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Simple redox reactions In simple redox reactions, we can easily determine the charge in elements on each side of a reaction Change in charges is indicative of a redox reaction For example: Zn + Cu 2+ + 2 Cl - -> Cu + Zn 2+ + 2 Cl - -----
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Complex redox reactions A redox reaction might not be obvious For example: 2 Fe + 3Cu(NO 3 ) 2 -> 2 Fe(NO 3 ) 3 + 3 Cu (Example 14.3b, page 551) ----------------------
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How to identify redox reactions Follow a set of rules to assign the oxidation number to each of the elements in the reactants and products in a reaction (in order to keep track of the electrons) Subsequently , Examine whether or not there is a change in oxidation number of the elements in the reaction If there is no change, the reaction is not a redox reaction If there are changes in oxidation numbers, identify electron donor(s) and electron acceptor(s) in the reaction ----------------------
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Note We think of oxidation state as “assigned charge” for book keeping purposes assigned oxidation states (+ or – ) are preferably put after the number (i.e. 2+, 2-, etc) ------------
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Rules for assigning oxidation number The best way for remembering the rules is to work on problems and examples (Several problems are covered at the end of this power point presentation. The solved problems are on blackboard, in a .pdf) We will cover the rules in the following slides ---
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Rule: the oxidation number of atoms in an uncombined element is 0 Examples: determine the oxidation state of K zero Fe F 2 H 2 O 2 S S 4 S 8 (0 for any element that has not undergone a reaction) ------
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Rule: the oxidation state of a monoatomic ion is the same as its charge Examples: Ion oxidation state Na + 1+ Cl - 1- Mg +2 ?
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