American Political Process- Exam 3

American Political Process- Exam 3 - American Political...

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American Political Process Exam 3 Study Guide Chapter 13 Summary (Pg. 391-392) 13.1— Analyze how the president’s national and partisan constituencies shape presidential decision making. Presidential Constituencies National Constituency Partisan Constituencies Partisan Support in Congress 13.2— Outline the major powers of the president and Congress’s checks on presidential powers. Separate Institutions Sharing Power The Power to Inform and Persuade Early Use of the Persuasion Power Modern Persuasion Power The Veto Power The Appointment Power The Cabinet The White House Staff The Power to Recommend Early Use of the Power to Recommend Modern Use of the Power to Recommend Timing Presidential Initiatives
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The President as Commander in Chief The President as Chief of State The First Lady The Vice President Inherent Executive Power Executive Orders Executive Privilege The Power to Pardon The Impeachment Power 13.3—Assess why presidential reputation and popularity are important to presidential performance and what factors contribute to presidential greatness. Presidential Expectations and Presidential Performance Presidential Reputations Presidential Popularity Great Presidents Definitions Administration: the president and his political appointees, who are responsible for directing the executive branch of government. Beltway Insider: the politically influential people who work inside the highway that surrounds Washington, D.C. Bully Pulpit: the nature of presidential status as an ideal vehicle for persuading the public to support the president’s policies.
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Cabinet: top administration officials, most of whom are heads of departments in the executive branch. Chief of Staff: head of the White House staff, who has continuous, direct contact with the president. Commander in Chief: the president in his constitutional role as head of the U.S. armed forces. Dignified Aspect: according to Walter Bagehot, the aspect of government, including royalty and ceremony, that generates citizen respect and loyalty. Divided Government: the control of the presidency by one party and the control of one or both houses of Congress by the other. Efficient Aspect: according to Walter Bagehot, the aspect of government that involves making policy, administering the laws, and settling disputes. Executive Office of the President (EOP): agency that houses both top coordinating offices and other operating agencies. Executive Order: a presidential directive that has the force of law, although it is not enacted by Congress. Executive Privilege: the right of the president to deny Congress info it requests on the grounds that the activities of the executive branch must be kept confidential. First Lady:
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2012 for the course PS 0200 taught by Professor Kabala during the Fall '08 term at Pittsburgh.

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American Political Process- Exam 3 - American Political...

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