Explicit

Explicit - class A { public: explicit A(int); }; void f(A)...

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Explicit In C++ it is possible to declare constructors for a class, taking a single parameter, and use those constructors for doing type conversion. For example: class A { public: A(int); }; void f(A) {} void g() { A a1 = 37; A a2 = A(47); A a3(57); a1 = 67; f(77); } A declaration like: A a1 = 37; says to call the A(int) constructor to create an A object from the integer value. Such a constructor is called a "converting constructor". However, this type of implicit conversion can be confusing, and there is a way of disabling it, using a new keyword "explicit" in the constructor declaration:
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Unformatted text preview: class A { public: explicit A(int); }; void f(A) {} void g() { A a1 = 37; // illegal A a2 = A(47); // OK A a3(57); // OK a1 = 67; // illegal f(77); // illegal } Using the explicit keyword, a constructor is declared to be "nonconverting", and explicit constructor syntax is required: class A { public: explicit A(int); }; void f(A) {} void g() { A a1 = A(37); A a2 = A(47); A a3(57); a1 = A(67); f(A(77)); } Note that an expression such as: A(47) is closely related to function-style casts supported by C++. For example: double d = 12.34; int i = int(d);...
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This note was uploaded on 02/27/2012 for the course CS 251 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Purdue.

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Explicit - class A { public: explicit A(int); }; void f(A)...

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