Ch 1 Theories and Research Methods BB Sp 12-4

Ch 1 Theories and Research Methods BB Sp 12-4 - Chapter 1:...

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Chapter 1: The Nature of Development
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What is development? Development Age related changes that are orderly, cumulative, and directional Three domains: Physical Cognitive Social/Emotional Development
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Types of developmental change Qualitative Change A developmental change involving a fundamental transformation in an ability or a characteristic Quantitative Change A developmental change involving an increase in the amount of an existing ability or characteristic
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Periods of Development Prenatal Period: Conception to Birth Infancy and toddlerhood: 0-2 years Early Childhood: 2-6 years Middle Childhood: 6-11 years Adolescence: 11-20 years
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Basic Developmental Concepts Normative Development General changes that virtually all children share as they grow older Individual Development 1) Individual variations around the normative course of development 2) Continuity within a child’s developmental pathway
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Basic Developmental Concepts Two opposing ideas about how children develop Continuous Development Changes are small and gradual Difficult to notice change Discontinuous Development Changes are made in steps and stages Easy to notice change
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Basic Developmental Concepts Nature versus Nurture Nature: Inborn biological given; heredity information receive from parents Nurture: Force of the physical and social world; neighborhoods, schools, communities and families
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Historical Foundations Preformationism (6th-15th century) Children are little adults; not a distinct phase in the life cycle John Locke (1600s) Children are tabula rasas - blank slate to be written on by life’s experiences Development is continuous Jean Jacques Rousseau (1700s) Development unfolds naturally in positive ways in genetically determined stages Charles Darwin (1800s)
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What is your basic stance on child development?
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Ch 1 Theories and Research Methods BB Sp 12-4 - Chapter 1:...

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