AASP 101- Lecture week 11 Reparations_1

AASP 101- Lecture week 11 Reparations_1 - AASP 101 Week 11...

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AASP 101 Week 11 Reparations and Affirmative Action
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What Are Reparations? A proposal that some type of compensation should be provided to the descendants of enslaved people in the U.S. and African Diaspora powerful and influential factor in the development of the country This compensation has been proposed in a variety of forms individual monetary payments to community-based improvement schemes The idea remains highly controversial and no broad consensus exists as to how it could be implemented Similar calls in Caribbean and African Countries
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Reparations and Present Day Struggles Reparations for African Americans and Africans in the Diaspora are sought to compensate Blacks economically and socially uncompensated slave labor restrictions on equal opportunities representation in the labor market more recent restrictions on wealth accumulation
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Historical Discussions about Reparations 1705 the Virginia colonial assembly White servants only 1865, after the Confederate States of America were defeated in the American Civil War, General William Tecumseh Sherman issued Special Field Orders, No. 15 each freed family forty acres of tillable land in the sea islands and around Charleston Exclusive use of Black people The army also had a number of unneeded mules which were given to settlers. Around 40,000 freed slaves were settled on 400,000 acres (1,600 km²) in Georgia and South Carolina President Andrew Johnson reversed the order after Lincoln was assassinated 1867, Thaddeus Stevens
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Historical Discussions about Reparations Sojourner Truth organized a petition campaign seeking free public land for former slaves 1890’s Callie House filed lawsuits and petitioned congress for reparations payments to African Americans $40 million for unpaid labor 1960’s Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee leader James Forman- “Black Manifesto” $500 million from white Christian churches and Jewish synagogues
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Historical Discussions about Reparations 1968 Republic of New Africa (RNA) with the purpose of establishing an independent black republic in five southern states with large black populations: South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana $300 billion in reparations Separation from White Hegemony Nation of Islam goal was to establish a separate state/territory so that Blacks could produce and supply their own needs 1989 National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in America public awareness about reparations
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Historical Discussions about Reparations 1989 Commission on Reparations for African Americans congressman John Conyers Succeeded in getting Detroit, Cleveland and to pass resolutions endorsing the tenets of reparations $8 million to establish a commission to study reparations proposals for African Americans. Calls for official apology for slavery and payment of
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2012 for the course AASP 101 taught by Professor Dr.dinwiddie during the Fall '11 term at Maryland.

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AASP 101- Lecture week 11 Reparations_1 - AASP 101 Week 11...

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