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AASP 101- lecture week 12 Prision Industrial Complex

AASP 101- lecture week 12 Prision Industrial Complex - AASP...

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AASP 101 Week 12 The Prison Industrial Complex
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Prison Industrial Complex Since the 1980’s one of the most significant trends in American society has been the construction of a massive penal system Why did incarceration rates rise since the 1980’s although crime rates have dropped since 1970’s? PIC is a political and economic interest group Mass incarceration is the product of a political push Changes supported by a shift in funding from social programs to prisons
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Prison Industrial Complex Political leaders have deliberately redirected billions of tax dollars away from investments in public education into the construction of “the prison industrial complex K-12, State and Local Subsidies Higher Education, Pell Grants It costs about $70,000 to construct a typical prison cell, $25,000 annually to supervise and maintain each prisoner
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Global Economy and Incarceration Changes in the global economy was another contributor to rising incarceration rates in the 1980’s Racial Marginalization Tripling of the prison population. Cut from access to jobs because of the bifurcation of economy Government cut funding for social services and public education Exclusion of people of color from access to jobs, education, social services and decent housing Conform to a social order: 1) give them a chance to improve their standard of living; 2) use repressive force to keep them in line. The latter has been the predominant mechanism used to “store order” in American society.
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Mass Incarceration and Stereotypes Force driving mass incarceration is the stereotypical perceptions about race and crime Political elites whose positions depend on the votes of the white middle class by putting a black and brown face to their fears. “black criminal” , the illegal immigrant (proposition 187) or the dreaded Muslim terrorist African Americans as aggressive, violent, hostile and short tempered influence whites’ judgments about crime.
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