Che Guevarra

Che Guevarra - Cuba & The U.S. and the writings and...

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Cuba The U.S. and the writings and political thought of Fidel Castro & “Che” Guevara
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Cuba The U.S. Unlike other Latin American countries, Cuba remained a Spanish colony throughout the 19th century. Cuba and the U.S. have had a love/hate relationship since. Even Maine (mainly Brunswick) imported large amounts of Cuban sugar, molasses, and rum, in exchange for Maine potatoes and granite.
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Cuba The U.S. After the U.S. conquered the Spanish territory of Florida in 1818, the U.S. government already had its eye capturing and annexing the Spanish islands in the Caribbean (Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic).
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Cuba The U.S. Then Secretary of State John Quincy Adams, in an 1823 letter to the American Minister (Ambassador) of Madrid, Spain Hugh Nelson, writes: “These [Caribbean] islands are natural appendages of the North American continent, and one of them [Cuba] -- almost in sight of our shores -- from a multitude of considerations has become an object of transcendent importance to the commercial and political interests of our Union.”
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Cuba The U.S. (Secretary of State John Quincy Adams, writes): “it is scarcely possible to resist the conviction that the annexation of Cuba to our Federal Republic will be indispensable to the continuance and integrity of the Union itself […] Cuba, forcibly disjoined from its own unnatural connection with Spain […] can gravitate only towards the North American Union, which, by the same law of nature, cannot cast her off from her bosom.”
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Cuba The U.S. During Cuba’s independence struggle, the U.S., invoking the 1823 Monroe Doctrine, played an important role in Cuba. When the U.S.S. Maine mysteriously blew up in Havana harbor in 1898, the U.S. declared all-out war on Spain and invaded Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Philippines -- known as “The Spanish-American War.” Today you can find a piece of the U.S.S.Maine in Saco.
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The U.S. Similar to Iraq today, the U.S. (under the command of Teddy Roosevelt) invaded Cuba in order to “liberate” the country. Also like Iraq, after the invasion/occupation, the U.S. created a government and constitution for the Cuban people. Under the 1902 Platt Amendment, Cuba was
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course HIS 241 taught by Professor Byrd during the Spring '08 term at UNE.

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Che Guevarra - Cuba & The U.S. and the writings and...

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