SantaAnna

SantaAnna - Antonio Lpez de Santa Anna (1794-1876) Santa...

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Unformatted text preview: Antonio Lpez de Santa Anna (1794-1876) Santa Anna at a glance: Santa Anna was a Liberal, Creole Elite that fought against the Spanish to gain independence for Mexico in 1821. He later became probably the most infamous Caudillo of Latin America. A Military General, who won battles against the armies of the Spanish, the French, and the Texans (1836, at Goliad and The Alamo). President of Mexico on 5 occasion: elected in 1833, but seized power through his military status in 1835, and took power later throughout his life as he saw fit. As President (Dictator), he changed his political philosophy to Conservativism, and tried to establish absolute power in Mexico City, which infuriated states like Texas. When the Texas Revolt came in 1835 among both English-speaking Texan Anglos and Spanish-speaking Mexicans, Santa Anna personally led the Mexican counter-attack, enforcing a "take-no-prisoners" policy at the Alamo and ordering the execution of those captured at Goliad (Central Texas). In the end, however, his over-confidence and tactical carelessness allowed Sam Houston to win a crushing victory at the battle of San Jacinto in 1836. Due to a so-called border/river dispute in Texas (though it is well known that President Polk wanted California for the U.S.), the Mexican-American War was fought in 1846-48, whereby Mexico lost half of its land to the U.S. After his failures as President, he was labeled a traitor to his country, he was exiled from Mexico in 1855. He died forgotten and impoverished in Mexico City in 1874. "[it] is very true that I threw up my cap for liberty with great ardor, and perfect sincerity, but very soon found the folly of it. A hundred years to come my people will not be fit for liberty. They do not know what it is, unenlightened as they are, and under the influence of a Catholic clergy, a despotism is the proper government for them, but there is no reason why it should not be a wise and virtuous one." Santa Anna (1836) in reply to former American envoy to Mexico Joel Poinsett after his capture by Texan Rebels. "General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna died in this city on the 21st. However he may have been condemned by parties, his career formed a brilliant and important portion of the History of Mexico, and future historians will differ in their judgment of his merits. General Santa Anna outlived his usefulness and ambition, and died at the ripe age of eighty-four. Peace to his ashes." Obituary, Mexico City, 1876. Excerpt of Mexico and Her Military Chieftains by Fay Robinson (1847) The Mexican people had been so long free from the Spanish rule that they looked on a return of their old masters as impossible, until, in the summer of 1829, General Barradas landed at Tampico in command of an army of four thousand Spanish veterans. Santa Anna was not then at Vera Cruz, but in Mexico in charge of his bureau; he was no sooner informed of the landing of Barradas, than with seven hundred men in open boats he crossed the Bahia...
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SantaAnna - Antonio Lpez de Santa Anna (1794-1876) Santa...

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