lecture 9 (13) - Nicotine and related disorders Medications...

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Nicotine and related disorders Medications Before 1984, there were no medications to help smokers quit. In that year, a nicotine chewing gum (Nicorette) was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a prescription drug for smoking cessation. In 1996 it became available without prescription. Nicorette was the first of several medications that are used for nicotine replacement therapy, intended to gradually reduce nicotine dependence in order to prevent or reduce withdrawal symptoms. This approach, called tapering, is used in withdrawal of other addictive drugs. About 15% of people using nicotine gum are able to stop smoking permanently. This rate is about three times higher than for people who simply go "cold turkey" and stop smoking without any assistance. Nicotine gum comes in two strengths. As it is chewed, nicotine is released and absorbed through the lining of the mouth. Over a six- to 12-week period, the amount and strength of gum chewed is decreased, until the smoker is weaned away from his or her dependence on
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2012 for the course PSY PSY2012 taught by Professor Scheff during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

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lecture 9 (13) - Nicotine and related disorders Medications...

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