lecture 10 (8) - Intermittent explosive disorder Causes and...

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Intermittent explosive disorder Causes and symptoms Causes Recent findings suggest that IED may result from abnormalities in the areas of the brain that regulate behavioral arousal and inhibition. Research indicates that impulsive aggression is related to abnormal brain mechanisms in a system that inhibits motor (muscular movement) activity, called the serotoninergic system. This system is directed by a neurotransmitter called serotonin, which regulates behavioral inhibition (control of behavior). Some studies have correlated IED with abnormalities on both sides of the front portion of the brain. These localized areas in the front of the brain appear to be involved in information processing and controlling movement, both of which are unbalanced in persons diagnosed with IED. Studies using positron emission tomography (PET) scanning have found lower levels of brain glucose (sugar) metabolism in patients who act in impulsively aggressive ways. Another study based on data from electroencephalograms (EEGs) of 326 children and
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2012 for the course PSY PSY2012 taught by Professor Scheff during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

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