Dis on week 4 - homeland and want to see it more...

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Mae Thinn (Christine) Discussion on week 4 readings Henry Kiyama’s graphic novel portrays the lives of four Japanese men who immigrated to the America. They had help from their Government to come into America and they figured that they would been more respected by other immigrants and especially Americans. Even though they are well-educated, they were just like any other immigrants to the Americans. These proud four men came into America believing that their country’s powerful Government was going to help their status in the community and in return, they each came with a goal that will help their country: to help the Japanese-American trade so that Japan becomes richer, to study and contribute art, to be like a successful Japanese farmer to make Japanese more well-known, and to learn about democracy to improve old imperialistic Japanese ways. It shows that even though they are trying to adapt in a new and different country, they still care about their
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Unformatted text preview: homeland and want to see it more successful. Also, just like any other immigrants, we can see that the Japanese people look out for each other and help when they are in trouble. In Raising Cane, we see another example of the Japanese immigrants being treated unfairly. The women immigrants especially had to suffer because not only they had to do the same work as men, they were also paid less because they are females. The occupation and wage depended on their race, and to those Japanese people who thought they were better than other immigrants, it was a big surprise. All workers were treated like animals by the lunas and had to work in any kind of weather. They compared the plantation to a prison because they had no freedom at all. All these conditions lead them to using drugs and gambling. They even strike back to express their discontent and to gain more rights such as education and better employment opportunities....
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2012 for the course HIS AAST 201/ taught by Professor Shinagawa during the Spring '11 term at Maryland.

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