Chapter 2 - Chapter 2: The Field of Communication Know the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 2: The Field of Communication Know the four key periods/themes in the history of the communication field and the key events in each. Symbolic activities, meanings, and ethics. Describe how the classical period contributed to the development of the study of communication. Socrates-->Plato-->Aristotle. Under the new democratic constitution was to bring legal claims against the overthrown tyrannical government, which meant citizens needed to learn to speak effectively and persuasively. Communication plays a vital role in democratic societies: The art of rhetoric was born in the mid 400s BC in the port city of Syracuse on the Island of Sicily, where sicilians overthrew an oppresive political regime and established a democratic society. Socrates, Aristotle, Isocrates, and Plato. Plato was a student of socrates, who founded a school and believed that truth is absolute and can be known only in ideal forms and not concrete reality. He was suspicious of rhetoric - realize d it could be manipulated and perceived. Aristotle was a student of Plato who did not see him eye to eye- he believed that truth could be discerned and truth was related to his belief that rhetoric is central to civic life in a democratic society. Describe how the liberal education period contributed to the development of the study of communication. Emphasized to teach that people must be able to voice their ideas and to listen thoughtfully and critically to the ideas of others. Two organizations- AEJMC which promotes research and teaching. Describe how the broadening of the field period contributed to the development of the study of communication. Promotes communication in a range of cultures and geographic area and adds sensitivity training and human relations to the traditional coverage of group decision making. Reflects the influence of French philosopher, Michel Foucalt, who was deeply concerned with who is and who is not allowed to speak in a society. He illuminated the ways in which culturally enriched rules (unwritten ones) and define who gets to speak, who we listen to and whose views are
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/28/2012 for the course COM 134 taught by Professor Frymier during the Fall '08 term at Miami University.

Page1 / 3

Chapter 2 - Chapter 2: The Field of Communication Know the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online