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Chapter 2 vocabulary - Chapter 2 vocabulary Milky way...

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Chapter 2 vocabulary Milky way galaxy – a falttened disk shaped mass estimated to contain nearly 400 billion stars. Gravity – the mutual attracting force exerted by the mass of an object upon all other objects, was the key force in condensing solar nebula Planetisimal hypothesis – or dust-cloud hypothesis, explains how suns condense from nebular cloud with plantisimals forming in orbits about the central mass Speed of light – is 300,000 k/m per second in other terms for all you sticklers out there 9.5 trillion kilometers per year. Perihelion - when earth is at its closest postion to the sun during northern hemisphere winter. Aphelion – farthest position from the sun during the northern hemisphere summer Fusion – suns abundant hydrogen atoms are forced together pairs of hydrogen nuclei are joined in this process, they form helium the second lightest element in nature Solar wind – the sun constantly emits clouds of electrically charged particles that surge outward in all directions. An ellis – a completely random ball of energy that can heat up to temperatures of over 3,000 degrees, occurs spontaneously and recklessly and can harm anything in its path Sunspots – caused by magnetic storms on the sun Magnetosphere – is a magnetic field surrounding earth generated by dynamo-like motions within our planet. Deflects solar win towards both of earths poles.
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