3169335-Lymphatic-System

3169335-Lymphatic-System - The Lymphatic System Lymphatic...

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The Lymphatic System Lymphatic System consists of fluid called lymph flowing inside the lymphatic vessels, some structure and tissues that contain lymphatic tissue and bone marrow. Bone marrow houses Stem cells that develop into lymphocytes and provide immunity. When interstitial fluid passes in to lymphatic vessels, it is called Lymph i.e. Clear water. Interstitial fluid and lymph are basically same except for location. Filtration forces water and dissolved substances from the capillaries into the interstitial fluid. Not all of this water is returned to the blood by osmosis, and excess fluid is picked up by lymph capillaries to become lymph. Functions of the lymphatic system: 1) Draining Interstitial fluid: To maintain the pressure and volume of the extracellular fluid by returning excess water and dissolved substances from the interstitial fluid to the circulation. 2) Protecting against invasion: Lymph nodes and other lymphoid tissues are the site for production of immuno- competent lymphocytes and macrophages in the specific immune response. T lymphocytes rupture foreign cells or produce toxins while B lymphocytes differentiate in to plasma cells that secrete antibodies. 3) Transporting Dietary lipids: Lymphatic vessels carry lipids and lipid soluble vitamins (ADEK) absorbed by gastro- intestinal tract.
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Lymph capillaries: Close ended vessels lies in the space between cells. It carries many pores which allow interstitial fluid including large lipids to get inside the lymphatic circulation but do not allow coming out. Lacteals: (Lacteal = Milky) Each Villi in the small intestine has centrally placed lymphatic vessels called Lacteal. It transport lipids absorbed in the intestine. From lymph capillaries fluid flows into lymph veins (lymphatic vessels) which virtually parallel the circulatory veins and are structurally very similar to them, including the presence of semilunar valves. Lymphatic Vessels: L ymph capillaries unite to form Lymphatic vessels. Resemble vein in structure except it is thin and have more valves. Lymph capillaries containing lymph are found through out the body except in 1. Avascular tissue 2. Central Nervous System 3. Spleenic pulp 4. Bone marrow Lymphatic Ducts: The lymphatic veins flow into one of two lymph ducts. 1. The right lymph duct drains the right arm, shoulder area, and the right side of the head and neck. It is half inch in length. 2. The left lymph duct (thoracic duct) , drains everything else, including the legs, GI tract and other abdominal
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organs, thoracic organs, and the left side of the head and neck and left arm and shoulder. It is 15-18 inches in length and is a major vessel of the system. These ducts then drain into the subclavian veins on each side where they join the internal jugular veins to form the brachiocephalic veins. Formation and flow of lymph:
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2012 for the course BIO 1101 taught by Professor Robinson during the Spring '09 term at University of Central Florida.

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3169335-Lymphatic-System - The Lymphatic System Lymphatic...

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