Ch11 Introductory Parts

Ch11 Introductory Parts - 9/16/2008 1 Goal Setting Gets...

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Unformatted text preview: 9/16/2008 1 Goal Setting Gets Results Goal Setting Gets Results If you want to succeed, set goals on a regular basis and evaluate how well ti th you are meeting them. A study of Yale University graduates found that the three percent who had written goals at graduation were worth more in financial terms than the other 97 percent put together. Besides gaining financial success, the three percent also seemed happier. Whats important to you? What do you want to accomplish? If you can, put those things in writing and look at them once in a while. Don Bagin, Communication Briefings , Vol. 7, No. 6, p. 1. Introduction Introduction ---- 11 Elements 11 Elements Authorization Problem Purpose Scope Limitations Methodology Sources Background Definition of Terms Brief Statement of the Results Plan of Presentation 9/16/2008 2 Authorization Authorization The authorization tells the name of the person (if any) who is asked to write or tackle the report. If no one did (as in a voluntary report), then this introductory element doesnt appear. Problem Problem The problem is usually defined in the early portion of the introduction. In fact, many introductions begin with the problem and then proceed with the purposewhich is often determined by the problem. 9/16/2008 3 Purpose Purpose The purpose is the one element that must The purpose is the one element that must appear in every introduction. Furthermore, it is the most important single element because it determines what the writer includes in the report. You must clearly get across to the reader what the purpose is, by a statement like, "The purpose of this report is . . . ." Among other names for purpose are: "objective," "aim," "goal," "mission," or "object." Scope Scope The scope relates to the boundary of the The scope relates to the boundary of the...
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2012 for the course MGT 3353 taught by Professor Chiodo during the Spring '09 term at Texas State.

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Ch11 Introductory Parts - 9/16/2008 1 Goal Setting Gets...

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