Istanbul final

Istanbul final - Istanbul One City, Two Continents Kyra...

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Istanbul – One City, Two Continents Kyra Stone November 22, 2011 English 102 – David Scott Breakfast Time
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Cars buzzing down the street, sandals treading soft against the wood flooring, and the bubbling of the tea pot are all sounds that you wake up to on the average day. The house is quiet as the mother has already left for work (she lives on the Asian side yet commutes an hour and a half to work – by bus – to the European side) and everyone else besides the father are just waking up. As I would saunter into the kitchen, the table would be set with ornate plates and beautiful hand-crafted Turkish tea glasses. The sound of the television and the bubbling tea pot along with the smell of the freshly baked bread helped wake us up. Every morning we would be greeted with “gunaydin, nasilsin?” or rather: good morning, how are you? There was always a wide array of white cheeses ranging from types similar to cream cheese up to more pungent cheeses that were similar to – yet stronger than – Swiss cheese. Domates, salatalik, and zeytin (tomatoes, cucumbers, and olives) were also popular breakfast items. Although many Americans might feel that the transition from sweets for breakfast to savory items would be almost torturous, I quite enjoyed the change of pace. For one, I stayed full for longer and second, I absolutely adore cheese and bread. However there were sweet items such as honey, Nutella, and helva (a sweet dessert with a texture similar to fiberglass made out of pistachios) that could be eaten for “dessert.” Although on the average weekday breakfast might only last ten to twenty minutes; on the weekend (most likely Sunday as this was “holiday” for almost everyone) breakfast could last up to two or three hours with a crowd of ten or more.
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Changing Gears This is exactly how I woke up for seven weeks of my life. I had been thrown into a city of almost fifteen million (the fifth most populated city in the world) that was located directly on the Sea of Marmara and the Bosphorous River where I was coming from a town of about 13,000 that was located 6,500 feet above sea level in Northern California . I walked to school five days a week – but different from American schools, I was not required to be to school until nine. The streets were bustling with people on their way to work, school, or breakfast. Although construction of any sort was not frequent in any part of Turkey, I was in luck that I had arrived just in time for the start of a complete sidewalk facelift. The locals ignored the signs that read “Do Not Enter” and continued to make their way through the construction zones filled with heavy machinery, building materials, and – for better words – a lack of stable ground. The workers gave no notice to those who managed to make their way
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Istanbul final - Istanbul One City, Two Continents Kyra...

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